On the Record Summer 1994: A Magazine for Graduates: St. Mary's University School of Law

Dublin Core

Title

On the Record Summer 1994: A Magazine for Graduates: St. Mary's University School of Law

Subject

St. Mary's University School of Law

Description

A Thrice Told Tale or Felix the Cat, Thank You Professor Anderson, Reflections on A Lawer's Law School, Alumnae/i News

Creator

St. Mary's University School of Law

Publisher

St. Mary's University School of Law

Date

1994

Contributor

Barbara Bader Aldave, Tim T. Griesenbeck Jr., Michael S. Ariens, Marsha Cope Huie, Douglas R. Haddock, Jo Beth Eubanks, Sharon Nicole Humble, Kelly Patrick Brown, Robert W. Berry, Lisa Arch Rocheleau, Leslie Ann Coleman, Storey B. Heintzelman

Rights

NULL

Relation

On the Record: A Magazine for Graduates: St. Mary's University School of Law

Format

RFC3778

Language

English, en-US

Type

Text

Identifier

STMULaw_OnTheRecord1994Summer

Coverage

1994

PDF Search

Text

A Thrice .. Told
Tale, or Felix
the Cat

Thank You,
Professor
Anderson

Reflections on
"A Lawyer's
Law School"

6

14

r8

New Plaza Graces the Law School Campus

Alumn(e/i
News 30

Summer 1994

IN APPRECIATION FOR HIS SERVICE AS PRESIDENT OF THE LAW ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, DEAN ALDAVE
PRESENTS TY GRIESENBECK WITH A PAINTING OF THE LAW SCHOOL BY BROTHER CLETUS BEHLMANN, S.M.

By all measures, the first issue of On the Record was a great success. The feedback that we received from you, our graduates,
was overwhelmingly positive. We are delighted that you like
your new magazine, and that you want to keep up with what is
happening at St. Mary's University School of Law and in the
lives of your classmates and friends .

"As life is action and passion, it is required of a person that

Led by Elise D. Garda, our talented and resourceful Director of
Communications and Development, we have tried to make this
second issue of the magazine even better than the first . Among
the principal features of this issue are an abbreviated version of
an important scholarly article that Professor Michael Ariens
published in the Harvard Law Review earlier in the year, a tribute by Professor Marsha Huie to Professor Joe Anderson on the
occasion of his retirement, and the reflections of Professor Douglas Haddock on what the goals of "a lawyer's law school"
ought to be. This issue also offers a large selection of news
items about our campus, our students, our faculty members,
your A lumni Association, and the entire community of persons
associated with the School of Law.

The above quotation has always been one of my favorites, and
it came to mind when I saw the spectacular response by our
graduates to both our requests for information for Class Notes
and our Alumni Association's dues campaign.

We invite all of you, but especially those of you whose names
have not yet appeared in On the Record, to write to your Class
Agents. If you let them know where you are and what you are
doing, we will pass the information along to our alumni and
alumnae throughout the world. All of us look forward to
hearing from you.

Barbara Bader Aldave
Dean and Professor
St. Mary's University School of Law

he or she be involved in the action and passion of the times,
at the peril of being judged not to have lived."

-Oliver Wendell Holmes

On behalf of the Board of Directors of the St. Mary's University
Law Alumni Association, I want to thank every graduate who
contributed to the alumni -dues campaign. We more than
exceeded our initial goal! I also want to thank all the graduates
who volunteered to be Class Agents: they did a tremendous job
of compiling the Class N otes . Finally, I am especially grateful
to the members of the Board of Directors for their tireless
efforts and dedication to the A ssociation and the School of
Law. As you read about the Law Alumni Association's initiatives and successes in my report on page 30, you will see that
they are the result of a great team effort on the part of the
Directors and volunteers, who donated their time and energy
to help make St. Mary's University School of Law the best that
it can be.
I know that you will enjoy catching up with old classmates,
friends, and associates as you read the Class Notes. I think you
will agree that St. Mary's lawyers are wholeheartedly involved
in the "action and passion of the times." I look forward to
hearing more from all of you in future issues of On the Record.

££~.
Tim T. Griesenbeck, Jr.
President
Law Alumni Association

ST. MARY'S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW
A MAGAZINE FOR GRADUATES

Features

Departments
A Thrice-Told Tale, or Felix the Cat
by Professor MichaelS. Ariens

Campus News ............................ ..... ... ........ ................. 2

6

In Service to Others ...... ...... ............... ........ ....... ....... 22
Law School Campus Gets a Facelift ............... ......... 24
Meet St. Mary's Law Students ................................. 26

Thank You, Professor Anderson

Faculty Notes ............................................................ 28

by Professor Marsha Cope Huie

Alumn::e/i News

14

Law Alumni Association:
The President's Report ................... ....... .. .. ...... .. 30
1994 Distinguished Graduate ........ .. .. .... ..... ...... 34
Class Notes ............... ......................................... 35

Reflections on
"A Lawyer's Law School"
by Professor Douglas R. Haddock

18
University Administration

William R. Crow, Jr. ('78),

Rev. Joseph Uvietta, S.M ., Chancellor

Past-President

Rev. John Moder, S.M., Ph.D., President

Jim Cassidy ('94) ,

Charles L. Correll, Ph.D., Vice President,
Academic Affairs • Barry E. Abrams,
Ed.D., Vice President , Enrollment
Management • Thomas L. Heaton,

Vice President, University Relations •
Ruth Rodgers, Vice President , Student
Services • Daniel J. White, Vice President, Administration and Finance •
Bro. Eugene Meyerpeter, S.M.,
Assistant to the President for Planning
and Research.

Law School Administration
Barbara Bader Aldave,

Dean and Professor
Yvonne Cherena Pacheco, Associate

Dean for EnroUment Management
GeraldS. Reamey, Associate Dean for

Academic Affairs and Professor
Mary Brennan Stich, Associate Dean

for Career Services and Alumni Relations

Law Alumni Association Board
0993-1994)
Tim T. Griesenbeck ('76), President
Nelson A. C lare ('72), President-Elect
Fred Riley Jones ('79) , Vice President
H. Pamela Schoch ('77), Secretary
Alejandra Villarreal ('79), Treasurer

Student Representative
Michael H. Bassett ('87)
Charles A. Beckham ('79)
SueT. Bentch ('87 )
Martha Tobin Bersch ('78)
Rosa Marfa Cabezas-G il ('87)
Merrie Moore Cavanaugh ('84)
Edmund K. Cyganiewicz ('80 )
Dwain Dent ('76)
Judge Robert Dowd ('77)
Hon. Elma T. Salinas Ender ('78)
Curtis L. Frisbie, Jr. ('71)
Amulfo Gonzalez ('69)
Janet Riola Hale ('78)
Al Hartman ('73)
Leah Bumpus Kauffman ('93)
Suzette Skolka Kinder ('88)
Patricia Kramer ('93)
Vincent Lazaro ('89)
Susan G. Lozano ('89)
Patricia A. Macias ('90)
Don McCleary ('74)
Gilberta Mario Moreno ('81)
Randy Osherow ('77)
Yava Williams Scott ('80)
Ed Shaughnessy ('81)
Gwen Stallins ('88)
Mary Brennan Stich ('81)
John Vaught ('78)
Linda Wong ('79)

St. Mary's University School of Law was founded in 192 7 in San Antonio, Texas,
by the San Antonio Bar Association. Seven years later, the Law School was
accepted as part of St. Mary's University, an independent Catholic institution
founded in 1852 by four Brothers of the Society of Mary.
St. Mary's University seeks to give its students the knowledge and the attributes
of mind and character essential to the effective rendition of public service in one
of the learned professions. The Law School seeks to impart to its students a clear
understanding of the true function and aim of the legal system: the attainment of
justice.
St. Mary's University School of Law was approved by the American Bar Association in 1948. It was admitted to membership in the Association of American Law
Schools in 1949.
Enrollment is limited to approximately 750 students.
On the Record , a magazine for alumnae/i and friends of St. Mary's University
School of Law, is published semiannually by the School of Law.
Editor: Elise D. Garda, Director of Communications and Development,
St. Mary's Universicy School of Law
Design: Parallel Design, Inc.
Printing: Gordon Printing Co.
Cover Photo: Melanie Rush Davis
On the Cover: MAJOR
IMPROVEMENTS WERE MADE ON
THE LAW SCHOOL CAMPUS DUR-

0

ING THE SUMMER OF

Printed on recycled paper.

1993.

O NE OF THEM WAS THE CRE-

St. Mary's University School of Law
One Camino Santa Maria
San Antonio, Texas 78228-8606
(210) 436-3424

ATION OF THE LAW SCHOOL
PLAZA, COMPLETE WITH TABLES,
CHAIRS, UMBRELLAS- AND
GAZEBO.

Copyright © 1994 On che Record. All rights reserved.

CAMPUS

NEWS

The St. Mary's Institute is designed
for students who wish to gain a
deeper understanding of the law of
international human rights and its
application in real life.

•••

School of Law Establishes
Institute on Human Rights
The St. Mary's Institute on International
Human Rights is the latest addition to
an array of offerings in international
and comparative law at St. Mary's University School of Law. The Institute
inaugurated its program during the last
week in May, when its directors conducted a seven-day study tour in El
Salvador. The tour was led by Monica
Schurtman (J.D., New York University
School of Law) and Larry Hufford
(Ph.D., The London School of Economics and Political Science). Ms.
Schurtman is Co-Director of the newly
expanded Immigration and Human
Rights Clinic, and Dr. Hufford is a
Professor in the Political Science
Department of St. Mary's University.
The St. Mary's Institute is designed for
students who wish to gain a deeper
understanding of the law of international
human rights and its application in real
life. Students enrolled in the 1994 study
tour learned firsthand about the relevance of human rights law to politics,
culture, economics, and the environment.

U .S. and Mexican business lawyers. The
Law School's Center for International
Legal Studies promotes international
understanding and legal cooperation by
providing research facilities for foreign
scholars. And the Law School's Centre
for Conciliation and Arbitration promotes
the resolution of commercial disputes,
both domestic and international,
through means other than litigation.

St. Mary's Initiates Faculty
Exchange with University of
lnnsbruck (Austria)
In spring 1993, Associate Dean and
Professor Gerald S. Reamey became the
first member of the faculty of St. Mary's
University School of Law to participate
in a new faculty exchange with the
University of Innsbruck (Austria).
Associate Dean Reamey taught an
introductory seminar on the American
Legal System and a seminar on American Criminal Procedure. In spring 1994,

St. Mary's now sponsors a number of
highly successful international and
comparative law programs, including
the St. Mary's Institute on World Legal
Problems, which attracts more than 100
students each summer to Innsbruck,
Austria. In addition, the Law School's
]oint Venture is an innovative transnational study and training program for
On the Record / Summer 1994

Professor Frank Hopfel of the University
of Innsbruck visited St. Mary's, offering
seminars on International Human
Rights and Comparative Criminal
Procedure.
"The exchange offers our faculty an
extraordinary opportunity to work and
research in a different legal and educational environment," said Associate
Dean Reamey. "We have much to learn
from our sister school's faculty and students, and there is much we can offer
them, too. 'Internationalizing' our curriculum and faculty in this way is a truly
exciting prospect, and one that is sure
to enrich the education we offer all of
our students."
The idea was initiated by Professor Fritz
Raber, former Dean of the University
of Innsbruck Faculty of Law, and was
received enthusiastically by Dean
Barbara Bader Aldave. "The faculty
exchange is a natural extension of our
summer program at the University of
Innsbruck, and we are delighted that it
is under way," said Dean Aldave. "This
is one of a growing number of international-law programs through which
St. Mary's provides both students and
faculty members with the opportunity
to broaden their understanding of global
legal issues and the means available for
their resolution." The St. Mary's Institute on World Legal Problems, which is
housed at the University of Innsbruck,
was established in 1985
and now is one of the
most popular overseasstudy programs offered by
any U.S. law school.

A SSOCIATE D EAN AND PROFESSOR
GERALD

S.

R EAMEY TEACH ING A

SEM INAR ON A MERICAN C RIM INAL

2



,~-·--, ,• •11[-;;
...;



P ROCEDU RE AT THE U NIVERSITY OF
INNSBRUCK.

St. Mary's Law Journal
Celebrates 25th Anniversary
Volume 25, Number 1 of the St. Mary's
Law Journal was published in the fall of
1993, marking the twenty-fifth anniversary of the law review. 'To commemorate this milestone," the editors wrote in
the frontispiece, "this issue features contributions by faculty members of the St.
Mary's University School of Law and
distinguished alumni."
Among the contributions is an article
by Associate Professor Jose Roberto
Juarez, Jr., entitled "The Supreme
Court as the Cheshire Cat: Escaping the
Section 1983 Wonderland," which
examines the conflicting directions
issued by the U.S. Supreme Court on 42
U.S.C. § 1983. In "Poverty, Pain, and
Precedent: The Fifth Circuit's Social
Security Jurisprudence," Professor Jon
C. Dubin analyzes the disability decisions of the Fifth Circuit and finds that
its evaluation of subjective symptoms,
including pain, "suggests that it has not
yet provided intelligibility for those
seeking initiation or guidance, including those representing persons whose
very survival may depend on the ability
to obtain or retain [social security]
benefits."
Professor Robert R. Barton wrote an
article that distinguishes constitutional
from statutory "defects" in accusatory
pleadings in the context of the post1985 amendments to the Texas Code of
Criminal Procedure, entitled "Since
1985, Can an Indictment or Information
Be Fundamentally Defective for Failing
To Charge an Offense?" Professor
Marsha Cope Huie, Faculty Advisor to
the Law Journal, challenges the Business
Judgment Rule and its effect on dividend
policy as that policy affects merger and
acquisition transactions in "Antitrust
and Corporate Dividend Policy: Revising Dividend Payment Policies To
Empower Shareholders To Curb Mergers and Acquisitions." And Peter H.

EDITORIAL BOARD

25th

VOLUME

Anniversary

Carroll Ill, a 1978 graduate of St.
Mary's University School of Law and
Senior Attorney, United States Department of Justice, Office of the United
States Trustee in San Francisco, contributed an article which examines the
evolution of the U.S. Supreme Court's
"strict textualistic approach to deciding
bankruptcy cases since 1991."
Other members of the faculty who contributed to the the twenty-fifth anniversary edition include Dean Barbara
Bader Aldave ("Women in the Law in
Texas: The Stories of Three Pioneers"),
Professor MichaelS. Ariens ("Constitutional Law and the Myth of the Great
Judge"), Assistant Professor Faye M.
Bracey ("Twenty-Five Years Later-For
Better or Worse?"), Professor Charles
E. Cantu ("Twenty-Five Years of Strict
Product Liability Law: The Transformation and Present Meaning of Section
402A") , Professor Mark Wright
Cochran ("1969: The Birth ofTax
Reform"), Professor Aloysius A.
3

25,

NUMBER

1

Jo Beth Eubanks, Editor-in-Chief
Sharon Nicole Humble, Executive Editor
Kelly Patrick Brown, Articles/Symposium
Editor
Robert W. Berry, Articles Editor
Lisa Arch Rocheleau, Articles Editor
Leslie Ann Coleman , Note & Comment
Editor
Storey B. Heintzelman, Note & Comment
Editor
Christy Jo Lindsay, Note & Comment
Editor
David L. Rumley, Note & Comment Editor
Julia C. Wommack, Research/Note &
Comment Editor
Anthony Avey, Associate Editor
Joseph Bourbois, Associate Editor
Jason R. Cliffe, Associate Editor
Katherine Anne Grossman, Associate
Editor
Patricia Sue Heil , Associate Editor
Carey Patrick Kinder, Associate Editor
Alexis Mabry, Associate Editor
Christopher Murray, Associate Editor
Whitney Moore Reilly, Associate Editor
Christopher Rulon, Associate Editor
Laurie Suzanne Smith, Associate Editor
Christopher Willis, Associate Editor

Leopold and Marie E. Kaiser ("The
Lord in the Law: Reflections on a
Catholic Law School"), Professor Victoria Mikesell Mather ("Evolution and
Revolution in Family Law"), and Professor Bonita K. Roberts ("The More
Things Change, the More They Stay
the Same: The Employment-at-Will
Doctrine in Texas"). The Honorable

EDITORIAL BOARD
VOLUME

1, NUMBER 1

Martin D. Beirne, Jr., Editor-in-Chief
Servando H. Gonzales, Jr., Managing
Editor
Nicholas L. Ribis, Comment Editor
Anthony G. Harris, Casenote Editor
Ronald L. Sutton , Research Editor
Frank B. Walker, Articles Editor
Stanley J. Eisenberg, Business and
Reviews Editor
Stanley R. Baker, Associate Editor
Robert M. Clark, Associate Editor
G.P. Hardy Ill, Associate Editor
Dennis J. Healey, Associate Editor
Morton L. Herman, Associate Editor
Harvey R. Levine, Associate Editor
Miles J. Mullin, Associate Editor
Michael J. McCormick, Associate Editor
Morris M. Reese, Jr., Associate Editor
Grady L. Roberts, Jr. , Associate Editor
Karen T. Ruble, Associate Editor
Doris K. Stockstill , Associate Editor
Clifford I. Weinstein, Associate Editor
Joseph N. Westheimer, Jr., Associate Editor
Gus E. Wilcox, Associate Editor
Leslie H. Williams, Jr., Associate Editor

M ARTIN

ST.

D.

John Cornyn, Justice of the Supreme
Court ofTexas and a 1977 graduate of
St. Mary's University School of Law,
contributed an article titled "Ruminations on the Nature of Texas Judging";
and two members of the St. Mary 's Law
Journal Editorial Board, Leslie Ann
Coleman, Notes & Comment Editor,
and Sharon Nicole Humble, Executive
Editor, each contributed a Comment.

The National Law Journal listed in its
"Worth Reading" column the contributions of Professors Barton, Cantu, Huie,
and Mather.

St. Mary's Law Student
Awarded Prestigious
NAPIL Scholarship
Cynthia M. Cano, a 1994 graduate of
St. Mary's University School of Law,
has been awarded an "Equal Justice
Fellowship" by the Washington, D.C.based National Association of Public
Interest Law (NAPIL). Cano, 29, a
native of Laredo, Texas, is one of seven
applicants from a pool of 242 students
from 122 U.S. law schools who were
selected to receive the prestigious twoyear fellowship. The other six winners
were third-year law students at Georgetown University, the University of
Arkansas, the University of California
at Davis, the University of Maine, the
University of Wisconsin, and Yale
University.
According to NAPIL, each of the seven
winners was selected on the basis of
"the applicant's qualifications, the worthiness of the proposed project, and the
quality of the sponsoring organization."
The finalists were presented to a selection committee composed of "prominent members of the federal judiciary,
private firms, and public-interest organizations." The fellowship will enable
Cano to work at the Immigrant and
Refugee Rights Project of the Lawyers'

B EIRN E, J R., FIRST E DITOR-IN-C HIEF OF THE

M ARY'S LAW J OURNAL.

On the Record / Summer '994

C YN THIA M . C ANO

4

Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
ofTexas, where, according to NAPIL,
she will "challenge and combat the
largely unaddressed abuse of authority
by INS border patrol officials in South
and Central Texas and along the TexasMexico border, through the implementation of a litigation strategy focusing
on individual claims, class action suits,
and community awareness."
"We are delighted that Cindy won the
NAPIL fellowship," said Dean Barbara
Bader Aldave. "It's great news for
Cindy, who truly deserves the award,
and for her future clients, the victims of
abuse, for whom she will be an outstanding advocate ."

New Texas,Mexico Bar
Association Established at
St. Mary's Law School
At a February 25 news conference at
City Hall, Mayor Nelson Wolff, Dean
Barbara Bader Aldave, and Academic
Vice President Charles L. Cotrell
joined Wayne I. Fagan and Onesimo
Flores Rodriguez, the Co-Chairs of the
Texas-Mexico Bar Association, to
announce the formation of the new
organization.
Housed at the St. Mary's Center for
International Legal Studies, the association was established in order to promote
understanding of the legal systems and
practices of the two nations, exchange
professional information regarding legal
issues of mutual concern, and develop
the infrastructure necessary to provide
legal services and resolve legal disputes
in cross-border transactions. The TexasMexico Bar Association/Barra de Abogados de Mexico y Tejas is led by sixteen directors, including the two CoChairs. Eight of the directors are Mexicans and eight are Texans. At present,
the members of the Association include
attorneys from throughout the State of
Texas and the four Mexican states that

0 NESIMO FLO RES R ODR IGUEZ, W AYNE

I.

FAGAN, J . J ORGE VERDUZCO, M AYOR N ELSON W OLFF,

D EAN B ARBARA BADER A LDAVE , AND A CADEMIC V ICE P RESIDENT C HARLES

l.

C OTRELL ANNOU NCE THE

FORMATION OF THE T EXAS-M EXICO B AR A SSOCIATION .

share a common border with Texas:
Chihuahua, Tamaulipas, Nuevo Le6n,
and Coahuila. Discussions already are
under way to expand the membership to
include attorneys from other states in
Mexico.
"Many of the systems and procedures
that have evolved to deal with legal
issues within our own societies will not
be adequate to address those same issues
when they cross national boundaries,"
said Fagan, Director of the St. Mary's
Centre for Conciliation and Arbitration.

"As lawyers who live in the Texas-Mexico region, we feel a special responsibility to our clients and our communities to
do all that we can to understand and
deal with the legal issues that will arise
from increased cross-border activities."
At the press conference, Fagan and his
Mexican counterpart, Flores, noted,
"We come together as equals, out of
mutual respect, to learn from each
other, to increase our professional skills
and knowledge, and to work together to
serve our clients and our communities."

"We come together as equals, out of mutual
respect, to learn from each other, to increase our
professional skills and knowledge, and to work
together to serve our clients and our communities."

•••


or Fe ix t e Cat
by Professor Michael S. Ariens

I

nfluence runs against, as well as with, time. Our appreciation of the constitutional
crisis of 1937 depends as much on the events occurring after that crisis as on the
events leading to it. The "lesson" learned from President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's
"Court-Packing Plan" and from the "switch in time that saved nine" depends on the
particular instructional manual from which one reads.

The manual I present focuses on the importance of Felix Frankfurter. I suggest that
Justice Felix Frankfurter tried to coordinate history to protect the integrity of the
Court as he saw it, and that he succeeded.

Much of the future

EXERCISING J UDGMENT R ATHER T HAN W ILL
The Court's power to invalidate state and federal legislative action has always been
based on the assumption that the Court exercises judgment rather than will. Although
the legislative and executive branches were intended to be political branches and were
allowed, within their constitutional power, to impose their will in law, the judiciary
was to stand athwart the political process, to exercise judgment in deciding cases, and
to ensure the supremacy of the Constitution.
The Court's authority to interpret the Constitution was thus linked to the Court's separation from politics. For post-World War II constitutional scholars, the most widely
known event suggesting that the Court was engulfed in politics was the "switch" by
Justice Owen Roberts during the spring of 1937, a switch that many believed was the
result of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "court-packing" plan. Understanding
the constitutional crisis of 1937 requires another look at the machinations of Felix
Frankfurter. In this manual, Frankfurter plays two roles: one as Supreme Court Justice,
. and a second as guardian of the Court's virtue .
For Felix Frankfurter, the Supreme Court was a temple, a sacred place. It was sacred
because the Court decided cases (and interpreted the Constitution) according to the
rule of law. If, however, politics were to intrude into the Court, this intrusion would
lead to the Court's "desecration." As both a devoted worshipper and one of its high
priests, Justice Frankfurter tended the Court's garden of law from the wilderness of politics. From 1954 to 1959, Justice Frankfurter's challenge was particularly acute; the
Court was saddled with the heavy burden of proving that its decisions in Brown were
the result of an exercise of judgment rather than will, and Justice Frankfurter's version
.
of the events of 1937 helped to ease that burden.
In 1937, the Supreme Court faced a crisis involving its authority to interpret the Constitution. The crisis ended only after it appeared that the wall separating law from politics had crumbled. That resolution caused Frankfurter to lash out privately at the
intrusion of politics into the Supreme Court. In a March 30, 1937, letter to FDR,
Frankfurter wrote: "And now, with the shift by Roberts, even a blind man ought to see
PiCTUR ED AT LEFT: JUSTICE FELIX FRANKFURTER

7

of American law
depends on how the
events of 19 3 7 are
interpreted.
[Donald H . Gjerdingen, "The Politics
of the Coase Theorem and Its Relationship to Modern Legal Thought,"
35 Buffalo Law Review 871 ( 1986). ]

that the Court is in politics, and understand how the Constitution is 'judicially' construed. It is a deep object lesson-a lurid demonstration-of the relation of men to the
'meaning' of the Constitution."
Nearly a generation later, Frankfurter, by then a Justice of the Supreme Court, had a
new tale to tell. In a memorial tribute to Justice Owen J. Roberts published in the
December 1955 issue of the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Justice Frankfurter
successfully sowed the seeds of a revisionist history of the "switch in time that saved
nine." Justice Frankfurter's revisionist history permitted defenders of the Supreme
Court to claim that Justice Roberts had not altered his stance in 1937 as a result of
FOR's court-packing plan. Frankfurter's new story presented Justice Roberts's abrupt
shift in the spring of 1937 as one based on constitutional principle, and certainly not
on politics. Consequently, the American people, and their public officials, could continue to entrust the Court with the power of judicial review, because the Court's independent assessment of the constitutionality of state and federal law was necessary to
the proper functioning of the American democratic experiment. Justice Frankfurter's
new story took hold among a generation of legal scholars deeply committed to the
law/politics divide and came at time when the threat to that divide was particularly
acute.

J USTIC E OWEN J . ROBERTS

I suggest the following: first, Felix Frankfurter had a major impact on the course of
American law and understanding that impact is necessary in order to comprehend
twentieth-century legal history; second, Justice Frankfurter's revisionist history of Justice Roberts's actions in 1937 was only incidentally a defense of]ustice Roberts-this
history was primarily an effort to protect the Court's authority to interpret the Constitution at a time when Brown threatened to compromise that authority; and third, the
crisis of 193 7 was a turning point in our legal history because of what really happened
and more because the subsequent explanations and analyses of the crisis tell us much
about our desire to shape the past for use in the present. These differing stories of the
Supreme Court in 1937 also tell us something about the attractions and dangers of our
fascination with the rule of law.

THE STORY OF THE 1937 COURT FIGHT Is A TWICE-TOW TALE.
[Walter F. Murphy, Congress and the Court ( 1962).]

For more than a decade
and a half, most studies
of the constitutional crisis of 19 3 7 concluded
that politics, in the form
of FD R s reelection and
his Court reorganization
plan, caused the Court to
alter its voting pattern.

Although in 1934 and early 1935 the Supreme Court alternately pleased both friend
and foe of the New Deal, the Court set its course in firm opposition to the New Deal
with a series of decisions in May 1935. President Roosevelt responded initially by
attacking the Court's decisions.
The Supreme Court's 1935 Term brought more confrontation. Early in the Term, the
Court held unconstitutional the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933 as beyond Congress's spending power. May, however, was once again the cruelest month for FOR. In
Carter v. Carter Coal Co., five members of the Court held unconstitutional the Bituminous Coal Conservation Act of 1935, which set minimum prices for the sale of coal,
gave employees a right to bargain collectively, and created a structure to implement
area-wide wage and hour terms. One week later, the Court, in Morehead v. New York
ex rel. Tipaldo, held unconstitutional New York's minimum wage statute, relying in
part on precedent. Joining the "Four Horsemen" (Justices Butler, McReynolds, Sutherland, and Van Devanter) in the majority was Justice Roberts. Chief Justice Hughes
and Justices Brandeis, Stone, and Cardozo dissented. Morehead involved a state law,
not New Deal legislation. However, several years earlier, FOR had recommended that
a number of governors consider and adopt a minimum wage law based on the New
York statute. The Court's Morehead decision thus constitutionally blocked any such
action.

8

THE COURT-PACKING PLAN AND "ABRUPT SHIFTS"
A month after the opening of the Court's 1936 Term, Roosevelt was reelected, winning 523 electoral votes to Alf Landon's eight, and receiving over sixty percent of the
popular vote. On February 5, 1937, shortly after reinauguration, Roosevelt announced
his proposed legislation to reorganize the federal judiciary. Part of this plan was a proposal to nominate to any federal court one additional judge for each sitting judge over
the age of seventy. The President's proposal, ostensibly, was to reduce the overloaded
docket of the Supreme Court. Six members of the Supreme Court were over seventy,
and, not surprisingly, the plan gave the President the opportunity to nominate a
maximum of six additional Justices to the Supreme Court.
The Senate voted down the proposal on July 22, 193 7.
During this period, two other events stood out. The events were a pair of decisions by
the Supreme Court, each decided by a vote of 5-4. On March 29, 1937, in West Coast
Hotel Co. v . Parrish, the Court held constitutional the State of Washington's minimum wage act. Two weeks later, in NLRB v. ]ones & Laughlin Steel Corp., the Court
upheld the National Labor Relations Act.
The opinion in West Coast Hotel was read from the bench by Chief Justice Hughes.
Only ten months before, a majority of the court had held in Morehead that state
minimum wage acts violated the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.
Because the composition of the Court remained the same, these conflicting decisions
were possible only because Justice Roberts concluded that Washington's minimum
wage law, unlike New York's, was constitutional. Two weeks later, the Court determined in]ones & Laughlin Steel that Congress acted pursuant to its constitutionally
granted power to regulate commerce among the several states by regulating the terms
and conditions of employment of manufacturing employees. This decision seemed
implicitly to overrule Carter v. Carter Coal Co., which had been decided less than one
year earlier. The Court, again per Chief Justice Hughes, largely ignored Carter, neither
distinguishing nor overruling its interpretation of the Commerce Clause. Justice
Rob.erts was again the only member of the Court to join fully with the majority in
both Carter and ]ones & Laughlin Steel. In neither West Coast Hotel nor ]ones & Laughlin Steel did Justice Roberts write an opinion explaining the abrupt shift in his voting
posture.

In a memorial tribute to
Justice Owen 1. Roberts
published in the December
1955 issue of the University of Pennsy]vania Law Review,
Justice Frankfurter successfully sowed the seeds
of a revisionist history
of the "switch in time
that saved nine."

[E)VEN A BUND MAN OUGHT To SEE THAT THE COURT Is IN POUTICS ...
[Felix Frankfurter to Franklin Delano· Roosevelt, March 30, I 9 3 7]

Frankfurter's private reaction (publicly he remained silent, as he had about FDR's
plan) to the Court's decisions was immediate and unsparing. In addition to his letter
to FDR written the day after West Coast Hotel was decided, Frankfurter wrote to Justice Harlan Fiske Stone: "Roberts' somersault [is] incapable of being attributed to a
single factor relevant to the professed judicial process. Everything that he now subscribes to he rejected not only on June first last, but as late as October twelfth when
New York's petition for a rehearing was denied .... " Two days later, replying to Justice
Brandeis's letter, which speculated that "[o]verruling Adkins' Case must give you some
satisfaction," Frankfurter responded, "It is characteristically kind of you to think of the
aspects of the W ashington minimum wage case that would give me some satisfaction,
but, unhappily, it is one of life's bitter-sweets and the bitter far outweighs the sweet."
A day after ]ones & Laughlin Steel was decided, Frankfurter wrote to Charles Wyzanski
that "(t]o me it is all painful beyond words, the poignant grief of one whose life has
been dedicated to faith in the disinterestedness of a tribunal and its freedom from
responsiveness to the most obvious immediacies of politics ... "
For more than a decade and a half, most studies of the constitutional crisis of 1937 concluded that politics, in the form of FDR's reelection and his Court reorganization plan,
caused the Court to alter its voting pattern. Yet even as the political explanation of the
Court's actions in 1937 became the standardized version of events, Felix Frankfurter
9

P RESIDENT FRANKLIN D ELANO R OOSEVELT

privately laid the groundwork for a wholly different account of those events, an account
more in keeping with the post-World War II legal academy's faith in the principled,
disinterested judge.

FRANKFURTER'S T RIBUTE TO JUSTICE R OBERTS
In the December 1955 issue of the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Justice
Frankfurter wrote a seven-page tribute to Justice Roberts. Frankfurter's tribute had two
purposes: first, to honor a former colleague, and second, to tell "[t}he truth about the
so-called 'switch' of Roberts in connection with the Minimum Wage cases ...." Frankfurter accomplished his first purpose in little more than two pages; the remainder of
the tribute consisted of his attempt to resolve the second issue.
"It is one of the most ludicrous illustrations of the power of lazy repetition of uncritical
talk that a judge with the character of Roberts should have attributed to him a change
of judicial views out of deference to political considerations," began Frankfurter's
defense. Frankfurter took special offense when prominent politicians and academic
scholars repeatedly claimed that Justice Roberts's votes changed as a result of Roosevelt's court-reorganization plan. This charge was false, and Frankfurter was going to
refute it with "indisputable facts ." What were these indisputable facts?
Frankfurter made three arguments to refute this charge. First, timing was everything.
T o understand Justice Roberts's votes, a critical investigator needed to look at the
interstices of the United States Reports . On November 23, 1936, two and one-half
months before Roosevelt's court plan was publicly announced, an evenly divided
Supreme Court affirmed a New York Court of Appeals decision that had upheld the
constitutionality of the New York Unemployment Insurance Law. Because Justice
Stone was ill and thus absent from the bench at that time, the fourth vote to sustain
the act must have come from Justice Roberts . Because "[t]he constitutional outlook
represented by [that case] would reflect the attitude of a Justice towards the issues
involved in the Adkins case," Justice Roberts's vote on this date foreshadowed his vote
in West Coast Hotel. Any scholar looking only at the United States Reports, therefore,
would readily see that Justice Roberts's decision in West Coast Hotel was not influenced by Roosevelt's court-reorganization legislation.
Second, Frankfurter cited Justice Roberts's majority opinion in the 1934 case of Nebbia v. New York as evidence that Justice Roberts opposed the "constitutional philosophy" of the four dissenters in West Coast Hotel. In Frankfurter's view, Justice Roberts's
opinion in Nebbia "undermined the foundations of Adkins" and allowed Chief Justice
Hughes to rely "heavily" on Nebbia in writing the majority's opinion in West Coast
Hotel. Frankfurter suggested that the reader can deduce the outcome in West Coast
Hotel from Nebbia's logic; under this reasoning, Justice Roberts's Nebbia opinion
refutes any notion that Justice Roberts "switched" in West Coast Hotel.
P HOTOGRAPH BY FRANZ JANTZEN,
COLLECTION OF THE SUPREME COURT
OF THE UNITED STATES

On the Record / Summer 1994

Frankfurter's final and most important argument for Justice Roberts's principled decision-making, however, was found in a memorandum given to Frankfurter by Roberts,
and made public for the first time in the tribute. Roberts prepared this memorandum
at Frankfurter's request, which, according to Frankfurter, "took not a little persuasion."
Frankfurter stated that Roberts gave him the memorandum on November 9, 1945,
after Roberts had resigned from the Court. For Frankfurter, Roberts's memorandum
confirmed the "independent" timing defense of Roberts's vote in West Coast Hotel.
Roberts's memorandum gave the following account: during the week of October 5,
1936, Justice Roberts voted to grant certiorari in West Coast Hotel, and shortly after
the case was argued on December 16 and 17, 1936, Justice Roberts voted to affirm the
lower court's decision and uphold the constitutionality of Washington's minimum
wage statute. As Justice Stone was ill and not voting, the Court held over the case
until his return, because a decision by an evenly divided Court was thought an "unfortunate outcome." When the case was again taken up on February 6, 1937, Justice
Stone's vote to affirm broke the tie, and the opinion was then assigned by Chief
Justice Hughes to himself. It was announced on March 29, 1937.
IO

One difficulty with both the timing and the Nebbia defense of Justice Roberts's
"switch" is that neither sufficiently explains why Justice Roberts voted to hold a state
minimum wage statute unconstitutional in Morehead in May 1936 and voted to hold a
nearly identical statute constitutional ten months later in West Coast Hotel. The statements in Roberts's memorandum have become the standard revised version of the reasons "synthesizing" the differing decisions: because counsel for the State of New York
in Morehead asked only that the Court distinguish the Adkins precedent, and not overrule it, Justice Roberts felt compelled to follow Adkins. Simply put, it was the fault of
timid and disingenuous counsel for the State of New York, who failed to urge the
overruling of Adkins. As the memorandum noted, Justice Roberts had told his
brethren, when the petition for certiorari in Morehead was discussed in conference,
that he in tended to follow precedent because New York did not urge overruling in

Adkins.
When the Court met in October 1936 to consider whether to grant certiorari to cases
filed with the Court over the summer, the Roberts memorandum states that four members of the majority in Morehead "voted to dismiss the appeal in the Parrish case." The
memorandum also states that Roberts voted to note probable jurisdiction, although "I
am not sure that I gave my reason." Because "the authority of Adkins was definitely
assailed and the Court was asked to reconsider and overrule it," Roberts wrote, "for the
firs t time, I was confronted with the necessity of facing the soundness of the Adkins
case." Although Roberts confessed error in not separately concurring the previous year
in the Morehead case, he concluded that "[t]hese facts make it evident that no action
taken by the President in the interim h ad any causal relation to my action in the
Parrish case ."
And there you have it.

REVISIONIST HISTORY RAISES MORE QUESTIONS THAN IT ANSWERS
The problem, of course, is that Justice Frankfurter does not deliver the promised
"indisputable facts," whether by looking at the interstices of the United States
Reports, by citing Roberts's opinion in Nebbia , or by making public Roberts's memorandum. Viewed critically, Justice Frankfurter's revisionist history raises more questions than it answers. These facts do not lead to the conclusion that in the spring of
1936 Roberts was "prepared to overrule the Adkins decisions." Aside from the memorandum, Frankfurter offered little evidence that was not available in 1937, when
Frankfurter himself was among the most fervent of those who believed that Roberts
had "switched" for political reasons.
Frankfurter's last piece of evidence, the Roberts memorandum, proved crucial in providing support for the revisionist history. Not only did his document reveal the previously private deliberations of Roberts, but it also bolstered the timing defense and
allowed Frankfurter to argue that Roberts's change in "judicial philosophy" came
before the announcement of FOR's court-packing plan.
The relevance of the proof found in the memorandum, however, is difficult to
determine.
First, I have several reservations concerning the existence of this memorandum. This
exculpatory memorandum seems out of place given Roberts's self-effacing character,
particularly given his attempt, in his "judicial executor" letter to Frankfurter, to avoid
any encomiums or justifications of his work as a Supreme Court Justice. It also seems
odd that the memorandum would have been "given" to Frankfurter by Roberts on
November 9, 1945, three months after he had resigned and returned to Pennsylvania.
The accuracy of this date seems even more implausible given that the Supreme Court
was in session. Further, the Court's inability to agree on the contents of a letter that
would recognize Roberts's service, and Roberts's disgust with some members of the
Court, make it unlikely that Roberts would have traveled to the Court from Pennsylvania to "give" Frankfurter this memorandum. Furthermore, Roberts's correspondence

II

With the near-universal
adoption of Frankfurter's
position in casebooks,
the revised history of
Roberts's "switch" was
secured.

As both a devoted
worshipper and one of
its high priests, Justice
Frankfurter tended the
Court's garden of law
from the wilderness of
politics.

with Frankfurter mentions no meeting between the two from October 1945 through
January 1946. Additionally, Frankfurter's correspondence with the editors of the University of Pennsylvania Law Review makes it clear that the draft tribute sent to the law
review contained no information explaining the creation of the memorandum. Only
after an editor, prompted by some members of the faculty, wrote Frankfurter that there
was some "feeling that some readers may be confused over when and why the memorandum was written," did Frankfurter add the information about the date of the memorandum. Finally, the original memorandum is apparently lost. Roberts destroyed his
papers; thus, a copy is not available through that collection. In the mid-1960s, historian John Chambers searched the Frankfurter Papers inconclusively for the original or a
copy of the memorandum. I myself have been unable to find the original memorandum or a copy in my searches through the Frankfurter Papers. No one with whom I
have spoken remembers ever seeing the original memorandum. The absence of the
memorandum obviously prevents independent analysis of Roberts's views. The memorandum's absence from the Frankfurter Papers also strikes me as odd, because Frankfurter seemed at an early date to keep thorough records, even of things that had much
less historic importance.
Second, even if Roberts authored the memorandum printed in Frankfurter's tribute,
several factors cast doubt on the accuracy of its contents. The tribute itself indicates
that the memorandum was written more than eight years after repeated requests from
Frankfurter. The memorandum was to be made public at Frankfurter's discretion (likely only after Roberts's death), and contained two disturbing factual errors. If the memorandum was written in 1945, only three of Roberts's colleagues were alive-Hughes,
McReynolds, and Stone-and by September 1948, Roberts was the sole survivor of
the 1937 Court. Therefore, no one was alive to question Roberts's actions as detailed
in the memorandum.
Third, and maybe even more perplexing, is what the memorandum does not contain,
namely, an explanation for some of Roberts's other votes in spring 1937. The memorandum does not speak of the reasons for Roberts's votes with the majority in]ones &
Lauglin Steel and the Social Security Cases. As discussed above, the former, which
broadly interpreted Congress's Commerce Clause power, effectively overruled the
1936 Carter v. Carter Coal Co., in which Roberts had voted with the majority. The
latter cases distinguished into oblivion the opinion written by Roberts one year before
in United States v. Butler. Additionally, the memorandum never explains why Roberts
failed to write a separate opinion in Morehead. It offers instead a mea culpa. (Did the
press of work cause him to fall behind in his opinion-writing duties?)

THE POWERFUL EFFECT OF FRANKFURTER'S TRIBUTE
What is most important about Frankfurter's tribute is its effect: his revised history of
the constitutional crisis of 1937 became the accepted history in legal academe. This
new version allowed legal academics to conclude that the decisions of Justice Roberts
in the spring of 193 7 were the product of legal reflection, not political pressure.
One reason for the rapid acceptance of the revised history was the prominent position
of its author in legal academe. This prominence, in tum, secured broad dissemination
of Frankfurter's writing. The tribute not only was published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, but also was included in Of Law and Men, a compilation of
Frankfurter's writings published in 1956.
From there, Frankfurter's revised history of the constitutional crisis of 193 7 spread
quickly throughout legal academe, and it has largely filtered down to the present. The
adoption by many constitutional law casebooks of the revised history of Justice
Roberts's switch played an even more important role than constitutional histories and
law review articles in disseminating the revised history. Beginning in 1959 and largely
continuing today, a number of constitutional law casebooks have cited Frankfurter's
tribute as evidence that Roberts probably was not influenced by the court-packing
plan.
On the Record /Summer 1994

12

The most influential constitutional law casebook to utilize Frankfurter's tribute has
been Professor Gerald Gunther's Constitutional Law. After becoming coauthor of the
Dowling casebook beginning with the seventh edition, Gunther not only cited the
Frankfurter tribute, but he also seemed to accept the proposition that, at least with
respect to the decision in West Coast Hotel, Justice Roberts had not switched his vote
in response to FOR's court-packing. All three of]ustice Frankfurter's defenses-timing, Nebbia, and Justice Roberts's memorandum-were accepted by Professor Gunther, whose casebook has been the most used constitutional law casebook for much of
the last twenty-five years. With the near-universal adoption of Frankfurter's position
in case books, the revised history of Roberts's "switch" was secured.

GUARDING THE SACRED T EMPLE
In a 1960 letter to Justice William 0. Douglas, Frankfurter wrote, "I expect from [my
law clerks] if not my own religious attitude toward the Court as an institution at least
a goodly portion of reverence for its responsibilities in our national life."
This religious imagery serves to explain Justice Frankfurter's desire to protect the Court.
Frankfurter had an absolute faith in the Court. As he once wrote, his life "ha[d] been
dedicated to the faith in the disinterestedness of a tribunal." The Roberts memorandum
was a hole card for Frankfurter to play if a decision or set of decisions suggested that the
Court was enmeshed in the "turbulence of politics" as during the years 1935 to 1937.
For Frankfurter and others, it was not necessary to prove to political scientists that
Roberts (and possibly Hughes) was motivated by concerns of reason and judgment, or
craft and principle. It was only necessary that preeminent legal scholars relay that
message to law students and lawyers. Publications of the Roberts memorandum created
the opportunity to claim that judgment (law) rather than will (politics) was responsible for Roberts's decisions, and allowed that message to be sent to legal scholars.

BROWN D ECISION R ENEWS D OUBTS ABOUT THE INDEPENDENCE

OF THE S UPREME COURT
Frankfurter's explanation of Roberts's actions in 1937 became the accepted history not
because Frankfurter elucidated "indisputable facts," but rather because this history better enabled legal scholars to defend the independence of the Court, which Brown had
placed in some doubt. When Justice Frankfurter found a "lawful" resolution to Brown,
the happy coincidence of his personal views with the requirements of the Constitution
was just that, a happy coincidence. For legal scholars sympathetic to the aims of the
plaintiffs in Brown, the goal was to justify the exercise of the judicial veto as both lawful and "helpful."
The result was that, from 1954 to 1959, Brown was defended by legal academics as
vitally important to American society and also as a legally unexceptional decision.
Professor Edmond Cahn suggested that Brown "spared the nation a genuine constitutional crisis, and that in this exigency the institution of judicial review rendered an
invaluable service."
If Brown was lawful, then it was authoritative, and thus required obedience by state
officials. The first civil rights act of the twentieth century would not be passed until
1957, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which named and explicitly adopted Brown,
was a decade away. Although Eisenhower ordered the District of Columbia to desegregate its school in advance of specific court orders, he was conspicuously silent about
Brown. Only a few months after the Court issued the remedy in Brown requiring those
public schools to desegregate "with all deliberate speed," the nation learned about the
acquittal of men in Mississippi who had lynched a fourteen-year-old boy from Chicago
named Emmett Till. In December 1955, Rosa Parks would make history for refusing to
move to the back of the bus. In early 1956, southern officials first coined the phrase
"massive resistance" to the Brown mandate, and from 1957 to 1959, the nation
continued on page 48

13

- MichaelS. Ariens (B.A., St. Norbert
College; ].D . Marquette University;
LL.M., Harvard University) is a Professor at St. Mary's University School of
Law. He teaches, writes, and lectures in
constitutional law, church-state relations,
American legal history, and the law of evidence. This article is adapted from "A
Thrice-Told Tale, or Felix the Cat," 107
Harvard Law Review 620 ( 1994).

A TRIBUTE TO PROFESSOR JOE EDWARD ANDERSON
ON THE OCCASION OF HIS RETIREMENT

by Professor Marsha Cope Huie
After twenty-five years as a full-time law
professor, Joe Anderson decided to
retire at the end of his twenty-s ixth
year. He spent his first full-time semester at St. Mary's in the virgin "new"
building, our present site. Earlier he had
taught as an adjunct professor, for two
yea rs in the old College Street building
downtown, then one year in rented
fl oors of the Maverick Building downtown. The Marianists had consummated
the sale of the College Street facility
(now the site of La Mansion del Rfo)
before completing the purchase of the
present site, requiring about a year's
interim stay in the Maverick Building.
That the law school with its whole
library was able to move twice within a
short time, Joe says, spoke highly of former Dean Ernest Raba's administrative
efficiency. Dean Raba hired Joe in 1968
when Carlos Cadena assumed the
bench of the Fourth Court of Appeals.
Quick to say he did not "replace" Judge
Cadena, Joe thinks Cadena influenced
Raba to hire him , although he has never
spoken with Cadena on the subject.
Born in Galveston in 1928, Joe is the
son of one immigrant and one first-generation parent. His mother came from
Dresden, Germany, at the age of eighteen. Since she spoke nary a word of
English, school authorities placed her,
to her humiliation, in the first grade
with tiny children, causing her often to
cry herself to sleep. She retained a thick
German accent to the very end. Called
"Johnny" by his family, Joe did not
know until he went to school that his
On the Record / Summer 1994

ers, his trunk sitting on the porch of the
Dean of Students' office, he moved to
the Campus Guild, a cooperative
reopened to students after World War II
and inhabited by campus radicals. Joe
recalls that the same Dean of Students
who offered him lodging at the Guild,
Arno Nowotny, always recited a poem
at the pep rally held before a Texas
game with A&M:

mom had an accent; he thought "Vel,
Chonny, vat chu doin"' was received
English pronunciation. Joe's father was
born of Danish immigrants in the Dakota Territory. His father thought he had
been born in Lincoln, Nebraska, but
was not certain because the courthouse
there had burned sometime before
World War I. Joe's parents met and
married in Galveston, a city on the
Texas seacoast having strong ethnic
groups of Italians and Germans.
CAMPUS RAD I CAL

Joe graduated from Ball High School,
the oldest high school in Texas. Then,
the first of his family to attend college,
Joe matriculated at the University of
Texas at Austin. There, for a brief period, he emulated his older brother Walter, who could, however, hold his
liquor. Expelled from two rooming
houses by nonsympathetic housemoth-

Don't send my boy to Baylor U,
The dying mother said.
Don't send my boy to TCU;
I'd rather he be dead.
But send my boy to Texas U:
It's better than Cornell.
But, rather than to A&M,
I'd see him sent to ... [long pause]
The American Correspondence
School!!!
He wouldn't say "hell." And the
students would roar.
The Campus Guild where Joe lived
called its annual party "The Red Ball."
When Heman Marion Sweatt (Sweatt v.
Painter, 339 U.S. 629) applied for
entrance to the segregated law school at
the University ofTexas, he was denied
admission . One of the administration's
arguments was that there were no living
accommodations for blacks. Joe's Campus Guild publicly offered Mr. Sweatt a
place to live; consequently, it became a
kind of pariah in the university's eyes,
and was placed on social probation.
Theophilus Schikle Painter, President
of the University of Texas, and his wife
came to dinner at the Campus Guild
just as its removal from probation was
under consideration. The Guild invited

[T]he first of his family to attend
college, Joe matriculated at the
University of Texas at Austin.
There, for a brief period, he emulated his older brother Walter, who
could, however, hold his liquor .

•••


a prominent black minister and his wife,
who agreed to sit between President and
Mrs. Painter: a proud moment for Joe
and the Guild.
Many of the Campus Guild members,
older than Joe, were veterans of World
War II and had been in academic-freedom marches before the war. They had
marched in support of Homer Price
Rainey, who had been fired for being too
liberal, and J. Frank Dobey, an author
who had been placed on administrative
leave of absence for his outspokenness in
championing academic freedom, particularly in defending John Dos Passos's
USA. (At the time, USA was a very controversial, celebrated trilogy containing,
Joe says, "some racy stuff which would
probably get a PG13 rating today.")
Influenced then by these more radical
elders, Joe now looks back with amusement, not regret, at this agnostic, almostatheistic period of his life when he temporarily rejected many of his birth values.
He recalls from that time, too, one of
history's ironies. The manager of the
women's gymnasium at the University
ofTex as was the sister of Alger Hiss.
Alger Hiss was an Eastern Coast plutocrat and a former law clerk to Justice
Oliver Wendell Holmes. Mr. Hiss was
later to be accused by Whittaker Chambers (Witness) of having hidden strategic government papers inside a pumpkin
as a Communist abettor. In fact, it was
Alger Hiss whose prosecution, in the
McCarthy era of Red-baiting, was to
propel Richard Milhouse Nixon into
national prominence. But back to
Texas: Joe remembers that an organization caUed Common Sense wanted to

JOE ANDERSON AND PEGGY McANINCH ANDERSON ARE HONORED AT A FAREWELL BANQUET HOSTED
BY THE SCHOOL OF lAW.

hold a meeting in Ms. Hiss's gymnasium. "No," she said, "I have a brother in
politics and I have to be careful that my
actions do not somehow reflect poorly
on him."
As an undergraduate, Joe spent more
time working to make a living than he
did studying. He worked at a university
cooperative bookstore, as a soda jerk for
two bits an hour, for a contractor digging ditches and laying foundations
("The best time to lay foundations is in
the dead of winter. The pay was a dollar
an hour."), and as a night watchman at
Gregory gymnasium for only sixty cents
an hour ("but that was a good job
because I got to work twenty-four-hour
stretches"). The first of his family to
attend college, he excelled in courses
that interested him but was unaware of
the need to do well in courses that
didn't ("Those, I passed.").
BOOT CAMP,

LAW SCHOOL, AND
PEGGY MCANINCH

To dodge being drafted into the Army
during the Korean "Conflict" (195053), Joe enlisted in the Navy, choosing
the sea because his brother Walter had
been in the Merchant Marine in World
War II. Wanting to make more money,
and having studied Russian in college,
he applied to be in Naval Intelligence
and sought a "queen's clearance," the

I5

highest security clearance. Perhaps
owing to his Campus Guild days, or perhaps to his having two close relatives,
his mother's stepbrothers, in the postwar Communist Eastern zone, or perhaps because as a college student he had
written a letter to the Russian embassy
inquiring about exchange-student programs, he was not to receive top-security clearance. "I was not a member of the
Communist Party," he says, "but I was
sympathetic to left-wing causes."
Waiting for his commission to come
through (which it never did), he went
to boot camp ("ninety days of Hell"),
then was quartered in barracks with all
sorts of undesirables waiting to be dismissed from the military. ("I was and am
an abject coward. Only my physical
stature saved me.") Still waiting to hear
from naval intelligence, he was sent to
sea on the USS Rendova (CVE114) for
what turned out to be a year, but with
his position in limbo. No word came.
He had no duties; he just "hung
around." Finally, when denial of the
commission to naval intelligence came,
he was informed that he might reapply
for a commission as a line officer, but
not for intelligence. Determined not to
commit himself to another four-year
stint in the Navy, he declined. And so
he was sent to the ship's education officer ("a drunken, obstreporous SOB"),
who didn't know what to do with him
but suggested he go to school somewhere.

He acquired the right-of-way for
Route 1604. (Yes, it's the Anderson
Loop but it's named after Charles
Anderson, a county judge, although
lots of people said it should have
been the Joe Anderson Loop.)

•••


Peggy McAninch Anderson descends
from a Scottish Minnesota family. Having convinced Peggy to marry him, in
Austin in 1950, Joe wanted to be placed
in a school in California, since Peggy
had found living accommodations in
Berkeley near her relatives. Learning
that a Class A Electronics School was
in Berkeley, he suddenly discovered a
life-long interest in electronics. The
thirty-six-week school was terribly hard.
He managed to rank second in his class
in theoretical electronics but penultimate in mechanical application. This
was one of the happiest times of Joe's
life. Peggy had a good job in Berkeley
for the University of California Extension Service, and they had an apartment on the corner of Dwight Way and
Telegraph A venue, a block from the
main gate of the University of California at Berkeley. But duty intruded and
sent him back to the ship. His ship was
the flagship of a task force which detonated the first hydrogen bomb, in
"Operation Ivy" ca. 1953. Joe's group
blew up the island of Eniewetok in the
Marshall Islands ("an atoll much like
paradise"). Now aboard ship, Joe asked
to be placed at a job nobody else wanted
because it entailed six weeks' schooling
on Oahu. After school, he was put in
charge of the ship's photo facsimile
gear. ("I didn't understand it; I couldn't
fix it; I just bought replacement
equipment.")

for torts, Charles Tilford McCormick
for evidence (the students called him
"Black Mack" because they thought him
a tyrant in class: "He spoke like a
frog."), George Winfred Stumberg for
criminal law, and William 0. Huie for
marital rights. In law school Joe's incipient detestation of elitism ripened. Perceiving himself to be from "such a poor
background," he felt that the privileged,
moneyed students got the breaks. Social
fraternities were "the epitome of all
evil." He became, and remains, an
advocate for the international labor
movement. Now, he most enthusiastically applauds the remarkable innovations of Dean Barbara Bader Aldave at
St. Mary's (the clinics, the brilliant
additions to the faculty and physical
plant, the broadened curriculum, and
increased alumni giving, to name a
few) . But even today he believes one of
the greatest problems of our law school
is administrative fiat from the top down,
including from non-law school university officers, with the absence of real faculty leadership. Still, he maintains, "I've
always been an observer and a follower.
I don't prefer to have trouble with anyone. "

His Navy hitch finished, Joe enrolled in
law school at the University of Texas,
to graduate in 1959. Page Keeton was
dean, and Joe's teachers were the elite
of southern legal academe: Leon Green

Arthur T roilo, now a prominent San
Antonio attorney, recruited Joe from
law school to the San Antonio City
Attorney's office, where he worked two
years while Carlos Cadena was City
Attorney. He quit to accept the County

On the Record /Summer 1994

r6

Attorney's offer of almost double his
city salary. Joe became the "right-ofway" attorney for Bexar County. He
acquired the right-of-way for Route
1604. (Yes, it's the Anderson Loop but
it's named after Charles Anderson, a
county judge, although lots of people
said it should have been the Joe Anderson Loop.) When, with nice historical
symmetry, Carlos Cadena resigned his
academic position at St. Mary's, Joe
joined the St. Mary's law faculty . The
rest is twenty-six years of wonderful academic history.

A MAN OF FAITH
These factors seem to animate Joe's
non-legal life: his marriage to the devoted, intelligent, and lovely Peggy, who
drives the family car because Joe will
not drive; his enviably healthy lunch of
raw fruits and vegetables; his daily rigorous exercise at the downtown YMCA
(some say he has the body of a thirtyyear-old); his locally famous musical talent (as a trumpeter; he played in the
Longhorn Band at U .T.); his passion for
collecting antiques and jewelry; and his
bedrock Christianity. Joe's religious faith
has informed his spiritual outlook, his
decency, and his ethical weltanschauung,
and is a source of profound strength.
But, he says, religion is "a private, even
secret, part of my life, because I practice
a non-mainstream religion." Raised and
baptized a Baptist at the age of twelve,

Joe expounds on his career, "My
colleagues thought, 'Why hire
somebody new? Just tell Joe and
give him a casebook.' All in all, it's
been a very easy job. Beats the hell
out of digging ditches for that
contractor in Austin."

•••


he soon abandoned the church. Influenced in college by freethinkers and
serious agnostics, even atheists, he
veered ever farther away from his religious upbringing. But he wasn't happy.
In his late thirties, he was walking
around his neighborhood in San Antonio one night when he ventured into
the Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist,
on Magnolia Avenue. "It was what I
needed. It's a very demanding religion. I
try to live my religion, but I'm only partially successful."

Question: You don't get sick?
Answer: I work at not getting sick.

Question: How?
Answer: By having absolute faith. We
view illness as a lapse of faith.

Question: How do you view people who go
to the doctor?
Answer: We don't judge other people.
Not judging is the hardest part. That's
where I slip. You should not judge, nor
criticize. You don't have to approve of
what other people do. All people are
created by God in God's image; even
the worst miscreant still has that. As
Paul said, "We must all work out our
own salvation with fear and trembling."
His wife Peggy and their son Johnny left
the Methodist Church to share in his
epiphany.
The tragedy of Joe and Peggy's married
life has been the death of their only
child and son, Johnny, born in 1957.
Johnny-Joe Edward Anderson IIattended Keystone School in San Antonio and then the University of Texas in

Austin. He was married to Kristin
Moseley for five years, until his untimely death. Johnny's sudden death, on
December 26, 1987, at the age of thirty,
"was a shock I've never completely
overcome. We loved him very much."
At St. Mary's University School of Law,
Joe has taught all these courses: (1) Legislation, (2) Federal Courts, (3) Federal
Procedure, ( 4) Land Use Regulation,
(5) Torts I and II, (6) Constitutional
Law-six hours' worth in the old days,
(7) Damages, (8) Eminent Domain, (9)
Evidence, (10) Administrative Law,
(11) Municipal Corporations, and (12)
Agency and Partnership.
Always self-effacing, Joe offers this
too-modest view. "I always thought of
myself as a journeyman law professor,
and that's a good thing, to be a working
person. Marie Sandoz, an underrated
author, has written about the late 1880s
in the Dakota territories in Old]ewels, a
biography of her father. It's a grand
thing to be a pioneer and work oneself
into the grave building a country-not
a pitiful thing like today's situation in
Rwanda. Hard work-labor-is what
made this country great." Joe expounds
on his career, "My colleagues thought,
'Why hire somebody new? Just tell Joe
and give him a casebook.' All in all, it's
been a very easy job. Beats the hell out
of digging ditches for that contractor in
Austin."
As my friend and next-door neighbor at
the Law School, Joe has-perhaps without knowing it-often offered me sustaining ethical and moral strength. His
intimates must always expect this lofty
17

phrase: "That person, the current irritant in your life, is one of God's children who as such must have some good
qualities." I've never found a satisfactory
rejoinder.
Through the years Joe has offered me a
life philosophy, gleaned from the wall of
a long-gone eatery in his beloved
Austin. I can't do better:
As you wander on
Through life, my brother,
Whatever be your goal,
Keep your eye upon the doughnut,
And not upon the hole.
Joe Anderson: scholar, musician, connoisseur, raconteur, upright person, my
colleague and friend. We shall miss him.

-Marsha Cope Huie (B .S., M.A., University ofTennessee; ].D., Memphis State
University; LL.M., Cambridge University) is a Professor of Law at St . Mary's
University. She specializes in commercial
law and the law of the European Union,
and has published numerous articles on
antitrust law, the latest of which appears in
The Antitrust Bulletin ( 1994) .

Reflections on
''A Lawyer's Law School''
by Professor Douglas R. Haddock
As a young lawyer in Minnesota some
years ago, I occasionally heard the firm I
was associated with referred to as a
"lawyer's law firm." I was not entirely
sure what the reference meant but I
know it was intended as a compliment.
The idea, I think, was that our firm was
one to which even lawyers would turn
when they needed legal help or advice.
In other words, we were presumably recognized, by those who should know, as a
reputable, reliable, and skillful group of
lawyers.
Some years later, at the time I was considering employment with St. Mary's
University School of Law, I noticed a
similar phrase-"lawyer's law school"in the St. Mary's catalogue. This concept was much more puzzling to me
than the idea of a "lawyer's law firm."
After all, what other kinds of law
schools could there be? At that time, I
had practiced law for five years and had
been in law teaching for almost five
years. The many lawyers I had met all
referred to themselves as "lawyers" and I
had not met many, if any, law students
who did not intend to become "practicing lawyers" or to refer to themselves as
"lawyers." What, then, could distinguish
a "lawyer's law school" from a mere "law
school"?

problems. With the rapid advancement
of knowledge and technology, with
increasing specialization on every front
in our society, and with the apparent
escalation of human and social problems, the staggering dimensions of this
sweeping mission of the lawyer have
become more evident.
In an article soon to be published,
Professor Michael S. Ariens surveys the
history of legal specialization in America
over the past century or so. He sketches
the general evolution of the profession

Ct t lTEP

To this writer, the Law School at
St. Mary's seems to be a place

THE MISSION OF THE
LAWY ER
In fact, the modern legal profession in
the United States has tremendous variety and there are many kinds of law
practice. Lawyers today are called upon
to complete an endless assortment of
tasks in ever-expanding arenas. In
essence, what lawyers have in common
may simply be that each assists other
people in the resolution of problems
encountered in their personal and professional lives. These problems, of
course, have a significant connection to
law, but in modern society requiring
that connection doesn't rule out many
O n the Record / Summer 1994

where both practical skills and
good habits of mind and heart can
be found and developed. It may be
a "lawyer's law school" in the best
sense of that phrase, but it is also
the people's .law schooi....[S]tudent
by student and lawyer by lawyer,
St. Mary's is making a positive difference in the way we and our society view the profession of law and
the pursuit of justice.

•••

18

and also reviews the lives of some of the
lawyers who have lived that history.
Part of that evolution arguably involves
a decline in the general practice of the
"country lawyer," exemplified by Abraham Lincoln according to Ariens, and
the rise of corporations and corporate
law practice. Although the nature of
the practice of law has changed considerably, some common threads may exist.
The image of "lawyer" I see has not
changed very much over the years, and
it covers both the country lawyer and
the corporate lawyer. It is a very "personal" image, wrapped up in the personalities of the lawyers and the personal
services they provide to those in need.
The clients and the problems may have
shifted somewhat from one form to
another but the personal relationships
and the ideal of service persist.
Perhaps the image of lawyer just put
forth sounds more idealistic than real.
As Professor Ariens points out, some in
the legal profession lament what they
see as a "decline" in the activity and
mind-set of lawyers from profession to
business, with an emphasis on earnings
rather than service. (I have often wondered whether business people resent,
justifiably, it seems to me, such disparaging comparisons with their professional
endeavors, which might also be defined
in terms of "service.") Whether this is
an accurate characterization of lawyer
attitudes or not, one pertinent conclusion seems undeniable: Because of the
expense, for many people and many
problems, the legal system and its
lawyers are simply out of reach. Perhaps
this has always been true, but, in any
event, neither our society nor our profession has yet realized fully its potential
for dealing with our problems. We have
been somewhat successful in blending
the theories and purposes of law with
the practical resolution of some people's
problems, but the problems of many
people and groups in our society rece ive
very little attention .

THE THEORY AND
PRACTICE OF LAW: Do REAL
LAWYERS EAT QUICHE?
This brings me back to the Law School.
I suspect that, for some, the phrase
"lawyer's law school" has meant a place
where "real lawyers" are trained for "real
practice," as opposed to a place filled
with academic and theoretical discussion and dialogue. Certainly there has
been for many years some tension on a
national scale between "practicing
lawyers" and "academic lawyers" (law
professors) that might be defined in
these terms. Based on my employment
experience with a state supreme court
(one year), a law firm (four years), a
state legislature (six months) and five
different law schools (nineteen years), I
believe there is much less to this distinction than some believe. The practice of law is lived, not merely learned,
and good lawyers are necessarily mindful of the theories and policies that
inform the law and our legal system.
Any supposed line of demarcation
between "theory" and "practice" is fictitious, not real. Law schools are equipped
to help law students acquire important
skills and information, including a facility for written and oral communication,
ability in legal analysis and thinking,
sensitivity to professional and ethical
concerns, and an awareness of what law
is. According to a recent survey reported in the November 1993 issue of the
American Bar Association]ournal, these
skills coincide with what many lawyers
expect new law graduates to bring to
the practice of law. I believe law schools
generally do a far better job in these
areas now than they did just twenty
years ago.
At St. Mary's University School of Law,
in particular, the response during the
last decade to the needs and demands of
both the profession (practicing lawyers
and students soon to become lawyers)
and society has been dramatic and

remarkable. Many excellent permanent
and visiting faculty members, and other
personnel, have become a part of St.
Mary's, adding excitement and variety
to the classroom, the curriculum, and
the campus. Dozens of new courses have
been added, including special courses on
environmental law, international law,
and comparative law, reflecting the
ever-expanding parameters of practice.
Many seminars have created additional
variety. For the most part, all of this has
been accomplished without eliminating
other courses in the curriculum and
without sacrificing the traditional for
the new. Options available to those
who would be "modem country lawyers"
and litigation lawyers have been
expanded and strengthened. Also,
greater emphasis has generally been
placed on what might be called "bridging the gap" between law school and
pra<;:.tice. Clinical experiences, for example, have been made available to everincreasing numbers of students, enriching both them and the under-represented clients they serve.
Consider the following particular developments. A first-year required course on
federal civil procedure was added to the
curriculum and then expanded from
three to four credits. Extraordinarily
gifted teachers added to the faculty in
recent years are teaching this course.
Reflecting the reality of practice, addi19

The practice of law is lived, not
merely learned, and good lawyers
are necessarily mindful of the theories and policies that inform the law
and our legal system. Any supposed
line of demarcation between
"theory" and "practice" is fictitious,
not real.

•••

tiona! emphasis also has been placed on
pretrial procedure for those who intend
to be litigation lawyers. A federal district judge is teaching the Federal Pretrial Civil Procedure course and local
lawyers teach the State Pretrial Civil
Procedure course. Trial Advocacy
courses, taught by a full-time professor
and a number of practicing lawyers and
members of the judiciary, also have
been expanded. The Law School also
has established "Solo Practice," a noncredit, no-tuition course available to
law students who are interested in opening their own practices. In this course,
taught initially by Robert E. Valdez
('80) and now by William A. Wilson
('80), students learn from practitioners
in various fields and are made aware of
the issues and concerns in solo practice
and how to cope with those concerns.

Clinical programs have been established
in the areas of criminal justice, civil justice, and immigration and human
rights. In each of these clinical programs students have opportunities,
under the supervision of excellent and
highly qualified faculty members, to get
involved in the lives of people who otherwise might not enjoy the benefits of
the American legal system. These programs help our students become competent lawyers but they also help our
lawyers respond in meaningful ways to
the needs of our society. In doing that,
student by student and lawyer by
lawyer, St. Mary's is making an important and positive difference in the way
we and our society view the profession
of law and the pursuit of justice.
BACK TO THE FUTURE

But for limitations of space, many other
activities and happenings could be mentioned. Graduates and friends of the
Law School should make a point of visiting the campus to experience the
energy. In recent years, St. Mary's University School of Law has been a place
where scholarly, practical, and useful
discussion and debate are expected on a
daily basis. One caught in the midst of
this environment gets the feeling of
being swept along, by a forceful but
friendly current, into the future. This is
On the Record / Summer 1994

a future not of scholarly contemplation
alone but also of active participation in
a world that needs the help of each one
of us. To this writer, the Law School at
St. Mary's seems to be a place where
both practical skills and good habits of
mind and heart can be found and developed. It may be a "lawyer's law school"
in the best sense of that phrase, but it is
also the people's law school. As an institution, St. Mary's University School of
Law has taken important steps that
exhibit a desire to walk boldly with
those, pa~ticularly its students and graduates, who are ready to stride into the
future.

-Douglas R. Haddock (B.A., ].D., University of Utah) is a Professor of Law at
St. Mary's University and Chair of the
Curriculum Committee. He began his legal
career as a Law Clerk to Justice W.F.
Rogosheske of the Minnesota Supreme
Court, and subsequently practiced law with
the St. Paul firm of Briggs and Morgan .
He began teaching in 1976 , and has served
as a member of the faculty at Hamline
University School of Law, and as a Visiting
Professor at Washington and Lee University, the University of Utah, and Hastings
College of Law. Professor Haddock has
taught and written in the areas of property,
civil procedure, conflict of laws, and professional responsibility.
20

CONGRATULATIONS

'



On May 15, the following members of the Class of 1994
were candidates for the conferral of Doctor of Jurisprudence
degrees by St. Mary's University:

John F. Adam, Jr.
David Ian Adest
Maria Monserrat Alsina
Shirley Marie Alvarado
Susan Elizabeth Anderson
Joseph P. Appelt, Jr.
Kristine Arlitt
Matthew Scott Arnold
Eduardo Arredondo
Anthony Alan Avey, magna cum laude
Robert Andrew Aycock
Dan Edward Balcar
David Glenn Balmer
Tamra Bandy
Peter Michael Barrett
Robert David Behrens
Diedrae Carron Bell
Carmen Cecilia Benavides
Robert William Berry
Robert J. Blech
Blakeney Anne Bobbitt
James Franklin Booher
Ronald W. Boorman, Jr.
Deena Terry Borden
Joseph Anthony Bourbois, cum laude
Kelly Patrick Brown, cum laude

J. Charles Bunk
H. Gene Burkett, Jr.
Tamara Grace Butler
Murray Williams Camp, cum laude
Patricia Canales
Cynthia M. Cano
James Michael Cassidy
Maricela Cavazos
Amanda Barrett Chapman
Christin Ann Chaskin
Carolyn Zimmerman Cheu
Allison W. Chitsey
Jason R. Cliffe
Evan R. Clift
Sarah Mullaney Clower
John Thomas Cody
Devin Kellison Coffey
Kay Ellen Cohen
Leslie Ann Coleman
Robert Mauritz Combs
Gayla S. Corley
John Richard Courtney, Jr., cum laude
Krista Michelle Cover
Rondaline Craft
Christopher Mitchell Crain
Shelly Kaye Cross
David Alexander Cuellar
John Pattison Danner
Thomas Julius Dansby, M.D.
Carole Connell Daubenmire
Mark Dodson Davila

Russell Allen Denton
William Michael Didlake
Douglas Divine
David Allen Dodds, summa cum
laude
Martha Sue Dodson
Rebecca Dolgener-Fisher



4~~

. -



'

Jennifer Elaine Dubin
Dorothy Sheryl Grant Duncan
Elisabeth Ashlea Earle
Hollie M. Eisenhauer
Carson Preston Epes
Blake Henry Estess, cum laude
Amy Michelle Eubanks
Jo Beth Eubanks, summa cum laude
Patrick John Filyk
Roy Gabriel Franco
Scott M. Freshour
Inez Cindy Gabriel
Carlos Garcia
Francisco G. Garcia
Hector Gonzalez III
Rebecca Hayley Gordon
Gregory John Corrie
Yogesh Parbhu Parmar Govindji
Joseph Graham
Marshall White Graham, Jr.
Katherine Anne Grossman, magna
cum laude
Jerry Guerra
Albert Martin Gutierrez, Jr.
Robert Roy Hamilton
Stephannie Leah Octavia Hancock
Daniel L. Hargrove
William Eric Harrison
Gerald Davis Havemann
Michael C. Hayes
Patricia Sue Heil, cum laude
Storey Blankenship Heintzelman,
magna cum laude
John Mark Hende~~on
Elizabeth Ingram Henry
Jacob Bruce Henry
Alejandro Hernandez
Camille Elizabeth Higgins
Jeffrey Alan Hiller, cum laude
Michael Lee Hoffman
Keith E. Holloway
Kristi Lynn Holt
Robert Edward Hughes, Jr.
Sharon Nicole Humble
James Kendall Hunt
Jack Lynn Hunter, magna cum laude
Michelle Lynn Iverson
Charles Allan J aphet
Nadia Roxolana Jarosh
Douglas Dean Johns

Cassandra L. Johnson
David D. Jones, cum laude
Robert Wood Joyner, magna cum
laude
Eric Karl
Stephen Patrick Karns
Abbie Kellogg
John Christopher Kilian
Carey Patrick Kinder, magna cum
laude
Kaye Elizabeth Knox, cum laude
Rashay Alynn Koster
Marina Thais Dovenat Kubecka
Ronna Ann Laidley
Roxanne Siller Leonard
Valerie Eleanora Edwards Lerma
Connie Kristiana Liem
Christy Jo Lindsay, cum laude
Alison J. Logan
James Vincent Lombardi Ill
Rogelio Lopez
Susana Lopez
Kathleen Elizabeth Lucas
Susan Hagman Lytton
Alexis Guion Mabry, cum laude
Stephen J. Marshall
Anna Maria Martinez
Edmund Arthur Matricardi Ill
Robert Mize Maurer II
Michael L. McCaig
Marcus Hamilton McCraw
Bryan W. McDaniel
Robert Neal McGehee, Jr.
Chance Michael McGhee
Henry Wilcox McGowen Ill
Scott Michaels McMillan
Sean Brandon McNelis
Yvonne M. Miles
James M. Miletich
Douglas Ronald Moe, cum laude
Ann Murray Moore
David Steven Morales
Dennis L. Moreno
Melody Eileen Morris
Pamela June Mullin
Lacey A. Mullowney
Shari Denee Murphy
Christopher J. Murray
Elizabeth Murray-Kolb

Carrie Loren Nelson
Robb Allen Nelson
Clarence Ubert Nixon, Jr.
Denise Michelle Nixon
Jessie L. Orbelo
Thomas A. Paige
Steven Michael Peiia
Elizabeth Chappell Pettigrew
21

Martin John Phipps
Arabia Vargas Pick
Virginia L. Piper
Richard Allen Pollick
Paul Vega Previte
Laura Potter Purcell
Ana Laura Ramirez
Maria Teresa Ramirez
Andrew G. Ramon
Rebecca Anne Ramos
Walter Brown Rand
Mark Alan Randolph
Lauren Clarice Ranly
Gwen Michelle Rawls
Michael Terrence Raymond
Whitney Moore Reilly, cum laude
Jose Juan Reyna
Beverly Stevenson Rickhoff
Lisa Arch Rocheleau
Arturo David Rodriguez, Jr.
Richard W. Rogers
Joe Rosales III
Thomas Joseph Rothe
Christopher Curt Rulon, summa
cum laude
David L. Rumley
Charles Russell Sablatura
Melissa Muller Saldana
Eric D. Sanderson
Linda Folds Sanschagrin
Bret William Schmidt
Karen Ann Schroeder
Lance Meador Schroeder
Dana Lynn Scott
Sharon J. Shumway, summa cum
laude
Robert Todd Sinex
Elizabeth Newlin Sjoberg
Edwin Dudley Smith V
Laurie Suzanne Smith
Thad Daniel Spalding
Karen Marie Speed
Jason C. Spencer
Jeffrey Scott Stewart
Scott Alan Stolle
Michael Alexander T abet
John Llewellyn Teter
Bryan Wade Thomason
Jason J. Thompson
Michael B. Walker
Thomas A. Ward
Arnetta Michelle Watson
Winton David Webster, Jr.
Robert V. West Ill
Richard Scott Westlund
Susan Gail White
Michael Elgin Wied
Christopher Wade Willis
James Wallace Wilson
Parker A. Wilson
Melissa Dianne Womble, cum laude
Julia Christina Wommack, magna
cum laude
Helen Kathryn Woodard
James Prentice Yeager
Charlotte Prendergast Yochem
Catherine Sanford Zimmerman
Randolph Blake Zuber

N

SERVICE

TO

OTHERS

Students Help Defend Indigents
in New Criminal Justice Clinic
by Associate Professor Jeffrey Pokorak

C rime is one of the most publicly discussed topics of our time. Ultimately,
however, issues about crime and our
collective response to it find resolution
in the most local setting: community
courthouses, where all the abstract discussions become dramas of convergent
facts and laws specific to unique circumstances. The local courthouses make the
criminal justice system one of the most
important institutions of our constitutional democracy, for it is in them that
both individual freedo ms and the rights
of society at large are protected.
The opportunity to serve either side in
criminal proceedings-the State in its
role as prosecuting agent and law-keeper, or individual defendants who face
the adverse power of that State-presents some attorneys with their greatest
professional challenge. The opportunity
to serve those who lack the financial
means to hire their own attorneys presents another challenge. Servicing the
indigent impacts not only the individuals who are represented and the attorneys who provide counsel, but also our
entire legal system.
The St. Mary's Criminal Justice Clinic
enables our students to gain valuable
lawyering experience while they serve
clients who cannot afford to hire legal
counse l. In an intensely supervised setting, under the guidance of some of the
best local criminal defense attorneys,
selected third-year law students practice
in a fully functional criminal defense
"firm." The student-lawyers represent
juveniles and adults charged with misdemeanors and minor felonies in the
initial stages of the clients' cases, and
may also handle state and federal
appeals.

On the Record / Summer 199 4

STUDENT-LAWYERS DISCUSS A CASE WITH PROFESSOR JEFFREY POKORAK, Co-DIRECTOR OF
THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE CLINIC.

MENTOR-ATTORNEYS HELP

To

GUIDE STUDENTS

The C linic opened its doors in the spring
semester of 1994, thanks to a generous
three-year grant from the United States
Department of Education. Its structure
provides the student-lawyers with three
tiers of supervisors: the C linic CoDirectors, Associate Professors Marsha
Merrill and Jeffrey Pokorak; the Supervising Attorney, Mark Stevens ('78);
and volunteer Mentor-Attorneys.
The last "tier" of supervision makes the
Clinic unique. The Mentor-Attorneys
are local attorneys who have excelled in
their practices. Clinical students are
paired with, and learn from, the five
Mentor-Attorneys participating in the
program: Michael Bernard ('87),
Nancy Barohn, John Hrncir ('71),
Sally Justice ('80), and Ralph Lopez.
"I only wish such a program had existed
when I was at St. Mary's," says MentorAttorney Sally Justice. "After law

school, I was on my own in the courtroom and had to rely on the kindness of
other lawyers and judges. This program
gives the students an incredible advantage over other recent graduates-and
many practicing attorneys."
Although access to representation is
constitutionally mandated in criminal
cases, the quality of the representation
afforded to a particular defendant
depends on the attorney's legal knowledge and practical training, and on the
number of clients the attorney is
required to represent in a relatively
short period of time . The Criminal Justice Clinic is a place where law students
learn how to be effective advocates and
to provide quality representation, which
is free of charge for traditionally underrepresented individuals in the criminal
justice system in Bexar County.
Through the Criminal Justice Clinic,
students learn their professional and
ethical responsibilities as advocates.
Attorneys have a duty to be good and to
do good. In accordance with that duty,
the Clinic strives to instill in its students a sense of the lawyer's responsibilities to the community as well as to the
client.
FROM CLASSROOM TO COURTROOM

The Criminal Justice Clinic bridges the
gap between classroom learning and
actual practice. Knowledge and skill are

22

The ultimate goal is to have
students in our clinics work on all
of the legal issues that an individual client might face, in order to
give that client a real chance to
succeed in society.

•••


I

synthesized in a challenging setting,
without many of the risks faced by practicing attorneys. Although the studentlawyers have primary responsibility for
all aspects of client representation, they
operate within several levels of supervisors and advisors, who regularly examine their work. Without having to
worry about overhead-paying support
staff, renting office space, or putting
food on the table-the student-lawyers
can focus on their clients' problems and
on providing the best legal representation possible.
"This past semester, I learned how to use
what I had studied in the other two and
one-half years of law school. Everything
came together in the Clinic," says Sarah
Clower, a graduating clinical student.
Supervising Attorney Mark Stevens has
played a critical role in ensuring the success of the new Clinic. A veteran criminal defense attorney in San Antonio,
Professor Stevens has represented clients
in trial and appellate courts throughout
the State ofTexas and has argued cases
before the Supreme Court of the United
States. His skill, experience, and consummate professionalism guide all the
students. "Professor Stevens was willing
to work day and night to help me prepare my case," says Albert Gutierrez
('94). "He helped me understand and
improve my case and had me practice
every aspect of the trial. It was hard
work, but when I went to court I knew I
was ready to represent my client."
"The students have demonstrated a
tremendous commitment to their
clients and to the program," says Professor Stevens. "The modern criminal justice system needs hard-working, honest
attorneys who will represent their

clients with energy, skill, and knowledge. The Clinic can't increase the students' energy, but it surely can improve
their abilities and show them that hard
work pays off."
STUDENTS SERVE THE COMMUNITY

While the Criminal Justice Clinic seeks
to produce excellent criminallitigators,
it also exists to serve the community.
Because indigents often face a panoply
of problems, students are required to
reach beyond their books to be effective
advocates. Adequate representation
often requires that student-lawyers
address issues related to family problems,
drug and alcohol addiction, poverty,
inadequate education, and poor mental
health.
The clinical program at St. Mary's
strives to take a holistic approach to the
needs of its clients. "The idea is to assist
the whole person, rather than simply to
tackle the client's immediate legal problem," says Professor Jon C. Dubin,
Director of the Law School's Civil Justice Clinic. "A client who faces a criminal charge may also be homeless or may
need help gaining access to benefits that
will provide food or lead to employment," he says. "The students who are
enrolled in the Civil Justice Clinic can
assist the client with his or her other
problems." Similarly, if a criminal conviction poses immigration consequences, the client will be referred to
stt.~dents in the Immigration and
Human Rights Clinic. The ultimate
goal is to have students in our clinics
work on all of the legal issues that an
individual might face, in order to give
that client a real chance to succeed in
society. In short, the Criminal Justice
Clinic has become an important
member of the family of legal-assistance
clinics now operating at St. Mary's
University School of Law.

23

TooLS To ExcEL
The Criminal Justice Clinic began with
ten students in the spring semester of
1994. Ten students are enrolled in the
summer session. In 1994-95, both the
size of the Clinic and the length of the
program will double: twenty third-year
students will participate for the entire
academic year. The expansion of the
Clinic will allow us to teach more to
more students, and increase exponentially the number of clients served.
Students who complete the course will
enter the larger world of legal practice
better prepared to deal with the complex responsibilities facing attorneys.
Although specifically trained in criminal litigation in the Criminal Justice
Clinic, these students, regardless of
their ultimate areas of practice, will
have been the tools needed to excel.
Throughout their careers, they will
carry with them an understanding of the
value of full preparation, zealous advocacy, effective negotiation, ethical conduct, and service to those in need. For
years to come, these St. Mary's graduates will be poised to make a favorable
impact, across the board, on the quality
of the legal profession.

-Jeffrey Pokorak
(B.A., State University of New
York at Binghamton; ].D., Northeastern University
School of Law) is
an Associate Professor at St.
Mary's University School of Law and the
Co-Director of its Criminal]ustice Clinic.
He spent the last decade, prior to joining
the faculty at St. Mary's in 1993, practicing as a criminal defense attorney in county, state, and federal courts, including the
United States Supreme Court. He teaches
courses in criminal law, capital punishment, constitutional criminal procedure,
and international criminal activity.

Law School Campus Gets a Facelift

On rhe Record / Summer 1994

24

uring the summer "lull" last year,
Associate Dean Mary Brennan
Stich ('81), the Law School's
Director of Physical Plant, temporarily
donned a hard hat to supervise a number of construction projects on campus.
Principal among these was the "Plaza
Renovation Project."

D

Dean Barbara Bader Aldave was
inspired to order the construction of the
plaza after reading a Forum article, written by a third-year law student, Buck
Bailey ('93 ). Bailey had an idea: "I
believe that the [warm San Antonio climate] ... could be turned to our advantage in the form of an outdoor 'cafe' ....
Mediterranean Europe is just as hot, if
not hotter in large degree. Yet the outdoor cafe has long been in evidence in
Spain, Italy, Greece, and numerous
other countries in Europe .... The Law
School has the location, the climate,
and the means to establish a simple
open-air gathering place."
"I loved the idea," said Dean Aldave,
"and the patio area in the cente~ of the
four Law School buildings provided a
perfect location." A few months later,
work was begun on the plaza and a
major embellishment: a gazebo.
Designed and built by Brother Tom
Suda, S.M., with the help of Brother
Bill McCarthy, S.M., the gazebo now
serves as a foodstand, grandstand, and
bandstand for law students at St. Mary's.

ON APR IL

14,

THE NEW PLAZA WAS FILLED

WITH STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF WHO
ATIENDED A COMBINED BLESSING SERVICE AND
FAREWELL LUNCHEON FOR TH IRD-YEAR STUDENTS .
THE TACOS, TAMALES, AND MARGARITAS PROVIDED
REFR ESHMENT; THE MARIACHIS AND CASCARONES,
OR CONFETII-FILLED EGGSHELLS, PROVIDED
ENTERTAINMENT.

A SSOC IATE D EAN M ARY B RENNAN S TICH AND B ROTHER TOM SUDA, S . M.

25

S T.

MARY '

s

STUDENTS

Patricia Canales ('94)

Connie K. Liem ( '94)

Hometown
Corpus Christi, T exas.

Hometown
Sugarland, Texas (born in Jakarta,
Indonesia).

Education
B.A., Government, University of Texas
at Austin, 1991 .
Honors; Activities
Student Representative to the Admissions Committee; student-lawyer in the
Criminal Justice Clinic.
Interests
Ranching, skiing, reading, traveling,
and music.

"Law school is both challenging and

Education
B.A., Government and Philosophy,
University of Texas at Austin, 1990.
Honors/Activities
Recipient of the 1986 Endowed Academic Scholarship; Alpha Epsilon Delta
Honor Society; 1993 Recipient of St.
Mary's Public Interest Law Fellowship;
Co-Founder and Program Director of
the Public Interest Law Association;
Founder of the Asian/Pacific-American
Law Students Association; 1994 Who's

Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges; 1994 Co-Recipient

Sister Regina M. O'Neill, O.S.F.
('95)
Hometown
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Education
B.A., Elementary Education, Holy Family College, 1975; M.A., Education
Administration, Villanova University,
1984; Principal's Certificate, Lehigh
University, 1987.
Honors1 Activities
Student-lawyer in the Immigration Law
Clinic and Civil Justice Clinic; Public
Interest Law Association; fifteen years
in elementary education. Participant in
1994 Institute on International Human
Rights Study Tour to El Salvador.

relationships at St. Mary's have

"True happiness and inner peace

"My experiences with the poor and

come from the satisfaction of know-

marginalized led me to seek a law
degree. The commitment to service
and the valuable clinical opportuni-

we have done no one harm, and

tice, and the strong student-faculty

Interests
U.S. foreign policy, modern philosophy,
tennis, and softball.

could with what we were given, that

spectives of both theory and prac-

Interests
Hobbies: Singing, reading, traveling,
and Irish history. Career Goal: To provide legal assistance to those whose
rights are most vulnerable-i.e. , children or refugees.

ing that we have done the best we

rewarding. St. Mary's offers the per-

ties at St. Mary's attracted me."

of the Mario G. Obledo Public Interest
Award.

increased my knowledge and appreciation of the law."

•••


that we have helped someone else
along the way."

•••

On the Record / Summer 1994

•••


Robert C. (Chris) Pittard ('95)

Ruben Valadez ('96)

Ralph E. Williamson ( '96)

Hometown

Hometown

Hometown

El Paso, Texas.

Austin, Texas.

Midland, Texas.

Education

Education

Education

B.A., History, University of Texas at
Austin, 1977; M.M.A.S., U .S. Army
Command and General Staff College,
1991.

B.A., Marketing Management, St.
Edward's University, 1986.

B.S., Petroleum Engineering, Stanford
University, 1968; M.S., Petroleum Engineering, University ofTexas at Austin,
1972.

HonorsI Activities

Dean's List; Phi Delta Phi; numerous
brief-writing awards; Regional ViceC hair of the Black Allied Law Students
Association; student-lawyer in the Civil
Justice Clinic.

Honors/Activities

Hispanic Law Students Association;
Criminal Law Association; Research
Assistant to Dean Aldave.

HonorsI Activities

Interests

Career interest: International law and
business law.

"After spending several years in the
public school system, I became
aware of the importance of positive
minority role models for minority

"After spending almost thirteen

children. I believe that, as an attor-

years in the Army as an Airborne

ney, I can be an effective role

Ranger Infantry Officer, I decided

model."

that I wanted to devote the rest of
my life to effecting positive change
in our society through the law.

Interests

American and French History, wine
collecting, travel, and foreign languages.

Interests

Civ il rights law and employment discrimination, family activities, martial
arts, and having fun.

Petroleum Engineer Honor Fraternity;
Treasurer, St. Mary's Environmental
Law Association.

"The law has been a strong interest
of mine for many years, and I am
very grateful that St. Mary's gave
me the opportunity to study law.
After twenty years as a Petroleum
Engineer and oil operator, the

•••


change is delightful and challenging. I look forward, as a lawyer, to
helping people with their problems."

St. Mary's is a great place to study
the law, and to begin my career in

•••


the law."

•••

27

FACULTY

Professors Barton and Dubin
Awarded Tenure
Professors Robert Barton, Hardy
Professor of Trial Advocacy, and Jon
C. Dubin, Director of the Civil Justice
Clinic, were granted tenure by the Rev.
John Moder, S.M., Ph.D., President of
St. Mary's University, upon the recommendation of the Law School faculty,
the Academic Council, and the Academic Vice President of the University.
Prior to joining the faculty at St. Mary's
in January 1989, Professor Barton
(LL.B., University of Texas School of
Law) had served as a Texas District
Judge for twelve years, a District Attorney for four years, and a County Attorney for five years. He has taught criminal law, evidence, constitutional criminal procedure, Texas criminal procedure, and trial advocacy at St. Mary's.
He is the author of Texas Search &
Seizure (Shepard's/McGraw Hill, 1993 ),
Texas Juvenile Officers' Manual (1978),
and Texas Peace Officers ' Manual
(1973). In January 1992 he was named
the Hardy Professor of Trial Advocacy.
Professor Dubin (J.D., New York University School of Law) joined the St.
Mary's faculty in the fall of 1990. Prior
to teaching law, Professor Dubin had
served as Assistant Counsel for the
NAACP Legal Defense and Educational
Fund, Assistant Attorney General in
the Civil Rights Division of the New
York State Attorney General's Office,
and staff attorney and Director of Litigation for the Harlem Neighborhood
Office of the Legal Aid Society of New
York City. He is the founder of the St.
Mary's Poverty Law Clinic (now known
as the Civil Justice Clinic), and he
teaches constitutional law and poverty
law . In 1993 Professor Dubin was given
the Distinguished Faculty Award for
Excellence by the St. Mary's University
Alumni Association. His article "From
Junkyards to Gentrification: Explicating
a Right to Protective Zoning in LowOn the Record / Summer 1994

N 0 T E S

Income Communities of Color," 77

Minnesota Law Review 739 (1993 ), was
one of twelve articles selected this year,
from approximately 400, for inclusion in

Land Use and Environmental Law
Review. The Review, published by Clark
Boardman Company, is an anthology of
the best environmental and land-use
law review articles written each year, as
selected by a panel of professors and
practitioners.

PROFESSOR ROBERT BARTON

PROFESSOR GERRY

W.

BEYER

Appointments and Honors
"St. Mary's Law Dean Screened forT op
Court," read the headline in a May 12,
1994, column in the San Antonio
Express-News. Written by political commentator Rick Casey, the column noted
that Dean Barbara Bader Aldave "was
asked several weeks ago by the Office of
the White House Counsel to send her
resume for consideration for the U.S.
Supreme Court." According to Mr.
Casey, Dean Aldave "learned she wasn't
a finalist when [she was] called to see if
she might be interested in any other
post."
Professor Gerry W. Beyer's article
entitled "Pre-Mortem Probate" was
selected the "Best Cutting-Edge Article" in the probate and trust category by
the editorial board of Probate & Property
magazine, a publication of the American Bar Association's Section on Real
Property, Probate, and Trust Law. The
Section will formally recognize Professor
Beyer and the other award recipients at
the 1994 ABA meeting in New
Orleans. Professor Beyer was the Course
Director of the 18th Annual Advanced

PROFESSOR JON C. DUB IN

PROFESSOR CHARLES CANTU

l.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR JOSE ROBERTO J UAREZ, JR .

PROFESSOR

Estate Planning and Probate Course
sponsored by the State Bar ofTexas in
Dallas in June, and has given numerous
speeches and lectures on property and
probate matters throughout the State of
Texas.

tiona! population law and policy. Prior
to joining the faculty in 1985, Professor
Mather practiced law for three years in
a small firm in Urbana, Illinois. She has
taught as an Instructor and a Visiting
Professor at the University of Illinois,
and served as a Visiting Professor at the
University of Texas at Austin during
the summer of 1993.

In March 1994, Professor Charles
Cantu visited the State Unversity of
New York at Buffalo as a member of an
American Bar Association Site Inspection T earn. He was the summarist of the
Association of American Law Schools'
section of the report.
Associate Professor Jose Roberto
Juarez, Jr., was named Chair of the
1994-95 Section on Employment Discrimination of the Association of
American Law Schools.
Professor Victoria Mikesell Mather
was selected by the Phi Delta Phi chapter at St. Mary's University School of
Law as the "Outstanding Professor" of
the Law School. Professor Mather
teaches and writes in the areas of family
law, property, estates and trusts, land
use, environmental law, and intema-

WAYNE Scon

PROFESSOR AM Y

Professor L. Wayne Scott was
appointed Chair of the Appellate
Practice Section of the State Bar of
Texas for 1994-95.

New Books
Studies in American Tort Law, a new
casebook coauthored by Professor
Vincent R. Johnson (with Gunn), will
be published this summer by Carolina
Academic Press.

H.

KASTELY

Carolina Academic Press has accepted
for publication another casebook written by a St. Mary's law professor. Con-

tracting Law: A Set of Course Materials,
coauthored by Professor Amy H.
Kastely (with Hom and Post), is
expected to be available in the fall of
1996. At the January 1994 conference
of the Association of American Law
Schools in Orlando, Florida, Professor
Kastely served on a panel which discussed "Teaching Contracts Using Outsider Perspectives."
Penn State Press has accepted for publication a new book, Notes of a White
Black Woman: Essays on Race, Color, and
Community, by Visiting Professor Judy
Scales-Trent. During the spring semester of 1994, Professor Scales-Trent, a
professor at the State University of New
York at Buffalo, taught a seminar in Law
and Literature and a course in Employment Discrimination at St. Mary's.

PROFESSOR VINCENT R. JOHNSON

VISITING PROFESSOR JUDY SCALES-TRENT

-.

~~·;

__

PROFESSOR VICTORIA MIKESELL MATHER

29

ALUMNfE/1

NEWS

Law Alumni A ssociation:
The President's Report

El Paso. Most of the other out-of-towners were equally active, helping to make
it a truly "working" Board of Directors.

by Tim T. Griesenbeck, Jr. ('76)

In addition, during the past year, two
"chapters" of the Law Alumni Association were established. Law Alumni
Association Director Vincent Lazaro
spent a great amount of time, working
with others, to establish the Hispanic
Chapter of the Law Alumni Association. That chapter is already on the
move: the members hosted the second
annual "Henry B. Gonzalez Awards
Dinner" in February, attracting more
than 200 attendees, and are developing
plans to launch a mentoring program for
middle- and high-school Hispanic students. Up the road in Austin, Mehron
Azarmehr paved the way for the formation of the Austin Chapter of the Law
Alumni Association. In April, the
chapter held an informal reception for
all members at Scholz Bier Garten. The
event was attended not only by Austinbased graduates, but also by graduates
from San Antonio, and by Dean Aldave
and other members of the administration and faculty at St. Mary's.

It is my pleasure to report to you the
great achievements this year of the Law
Alumni Association, and more importantly, to let you know about the substantially increased involvement of St.
Mary's graduates in the Law School. As
you may recall, the Board of Directors of
the Law Alumni Assocation made significant changes last year regarding the
structure and goals of the Association.
The three major themes of the changes
that emerged involved broadening the
participation of graduates on the Board
of Directors, increasing alumnae/i
involvement with the students, and
generating finapcial support for the
institution. I can report to you that your
Law Alumni Association has successfully accomplished these and other goals
we set last year, even beyond our most
hopeful expectations.
BROADENING PARTICIPATION

The 1993-94 Board of Directors reflects
more truly than ever before the broad
base of graduates and supporters of the
School of Law. Out-of-town Directors
were appointed from St. Louis, New
Orleans, Denver, and Washington,
D.C., as well as Dallas, Austin, Houston, El Paso, Laredo, Brownsville, and
Waxahachie. The membership of the
Board was evenly divided between men
and women, and there was a substantial
increase in the number of minorities.
Even more satisfying was the active participation of the Directors themselves.
For example, Judge Elma Salinas Ender
drove in from Laredo to make the meetings; Jon Vaught and Pat Kramer traveled all the way from Denver, Colorado;
Mike Bassett, Pam Schoch, and Curtis
Frisbie were Friday-afternoon regulars
on the Southwest flight from Dallas;
and Charlie Beckham came down from
On the Record / Summer 1994

INCREASING ALUMNAE/I
INVOLVEMENT IN THE

LAw

SCHOOL

In the area of alumnae/i involvement,
the Board has made great strides forward
with its outreach programs. The Class
Agent Committee, headed by Nelson
Clare, succeeded in appointing at least
one Class Agent for each graduating
class. The role of Class Agents is to
gather information about the members
of the classes they represent for publication in On the Record. The Committee's
efforts exceeded our expectations; as the
Class Notes section of this issue shows,
the response from our graduates has
been terrific. I hope you will continue to
inform your Class Agent of what is happening in your personal and professional
life, so that we may all keep track of
each other as the years go by.
Mike Bassett and the Career Network
Committee achieved a great first-year
success. Working with Pamela Schoch
and the Public Relations Committee,
the Career Network Committee organized a Careers-in-Dallas program at the
offices of Gardere & Wynne. More than

OFFICERS OF THE
AUSTIN CHAPTER OF
THE

LAw

ALUMNI

ASSOCIATION
President
Mehron Azarmehr ('92)
Vice-President
Guy E. Henry ('92)
Treasurer
Georgia L. Meaney ('93)
Secretary
Thomas J. Meaney ('92)

C LASS OF

'93

GRADUATES JACOB

N.

P OLLACK, J ENN IFER

E.

D UBIN,

AND M ILLARD W INN A TKINS ENJOY AN INFORMAL PARTY HOSTED BY
THE NEW A USTIN C HAPTER OF THE lAW ALUMN I A SSOC IATION.

30

thirty second- and third-year students
from St. Mary's attended the February
session to learn about the practice of law
in Dallas. Guest speakers were brought
in, and the students were given informative talks to help them "learn the ropes."
The student response to the program, as
reported by Associate Dean Mary Brennan Stich, was 100-percent favorable.
Congratulations and thanks to Mike
Bassett for spearheading the effort! Next
year, we hope to expand the program to
other metropolitan areas.
The Student Services Committee, led by
incoming President Fred Jones, also had
a busy year. In October, the Association
hosted a ''Tamalada" in the new Plaza of
the Law School to welcome all first-year
students, and in April we treated thirdyear students to a farewell luncheon
there. The Committee also hosted
mock-interview sessions for students at
St. Mary's and sponsored the Day-in-theLife career program at the Law School.
Finally, the Committee arranged to have
coffee and doughnuts available to all students during fall and spring finals.
Thanks to Susan Lozano, Sue Bentch,
and Mary Cavanaugh, the Oyster Bake
Committee also had another great year.
And the Distinguished Graduate Committee made an outstanding selection
when it named the Honorable John
Cornyn, Justice of the Texas Supreme
Court, the 1994 recipient. Justice
Cornyn's judicial career and other
accomplishments bring great credit to
both the Law School and its graduates.
He was presented with a plaque at a
wonderful reception, hosted by the Law
Alumni Association and the Law
School, at Club Giraud on May 13.
GENERATING FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Finally, the most significant accomplishment this year involved the successful implementation of the Law
alumnae/i dues initiative. As we noted
in On the Record last summer, the
bylaws of the Law Alumni Association

were changed to allow a volunteer dues
program. It was our hope that through
the dues initiative we would be able to
increase the number of contributors to
St. Mary's and lift the Law School out
of the "basement" position in alumnae/i
giving among U .S. law schools, as
reported by the American Bar Association. It is my pleasure to report that the
response to the dues program by St.
Mary's Law School graduates was fantastic! The Law School shot out from
the bottom of the roster, with a more
than three-fold increase in alumnae/i
giving. In addition, we raised nearly
$20,000, which the Board of Directors
has decided to use, in part, to establish
an endowed scholarship.
I wish to thank every lawyer who voluntarily paid dues this year, and especially
the hundreds of graduates who gave for
the first time. I hope that those of you
who have not sent a voluntary contribution will consider joining the ranks of
"card-carrying" members of the Association when the 1994-95 dues initiative is
launched this fall.
It has been a great pleasure to serve as
President of the Law Alumni Association during this challenging year. Your
support of St. Mary's and the Law
Alumni Association decisively exceeded our goals and expectations, and I
hope that you will offer your support to
my successor, Fred Jones, when he takes
office for 1994-95. These are exciting
times for the Association and for each
o( us who graduated from St. Mary's, as
the opportunities for supporting our
alma mater and its students continue to
expand. If you wish to become more
involved in the Law Alumni Association and its efforts to help the students
and the Law School, please give your
Class Agent or one of the Directors a
call. (We are especially interested in
hearing from anyone who may wish to
serve on the Board of the Law Alumni
Association!)
Good luck to all of you.

31

TIM T . GRIESENBECK, JR .

('76)

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
lAW ALUMNI BOARD

1994-1995
President
Fred R. Jones ('79)
President-Elect
Alejandra Villarreal ('79)
Vice-President
Suzette S. Kinder ('88)
Treasurer
Susan G. Lozano ('89)
Secretary
Charles A. Beckham {'79)
Immediate Past-President/ Board
of Trustees Representative
Tim T. Griesenbeck, Jr. ('76)
Student Representative
Scott A. Carlson ('95)
Newly Appointed Directors
Laura H. Burney ('84)
Tom Giltner ('86)
Leo Figueroa ('83)
The Honorable Andy Mireles ('72)
Suzanne Schorlemer ('91)
Sharon Thomas ('85)
Gilbert Vara ('85)
Andy Taylor ('87)

Card,Carrying Members of the St. Mary's Law Alumni Association
Ernest R. Acevedo, Jr. ('75)
Gustavo L. Acevedo ('58)
Valeria Villarreal Acevedo ('92)
William R. Ackerman ('92)
Larry W. Allison ('74)
Stanley R. Alterman ('83)
Louis A. Alvarez ('57)
Sylvia Andrews ('78)
Karen A. Angelina ('79)
Thomas D. Anthony ('83)
Teodoro Arevalo ('60)
Mehron Azarmehr ('92)
Jon athan B. Bamberg ('57)
The Hon. James E. Barlow ('54)
Roy R. Barrera, Sr. ('51)
Joseph Bart, Jr. ('52)
Diann M. Bartek ('78)
Chuck F. Bartush, Jr. ('75)
Sheena A. Bassett ('93)
Harry S. Bates ('84)
Thomas E. Bauer ('79)
Charles A. Beckman, Jr. ('79)
Martin D. Beirne ('69)
William E. Bender ('69)
Frances Bennett ('92)
Thomas C. Benson ('78)
Thomas R. Benson ('76)
SueT. Bentch ('87)
Steven J. Berry ( '86)
P. Brian Berryman ('89)
Mrs. Martha Bersch ( '7 8)
Joanne M. Berscheidt ('84)
Charles H. Billings ('78)
Ron Bird ('73)
Ward T. Blacklock, Jr. ('77)
Neil J. Blickman ('75)
Joe E. Boaz ('73)
John T. Bode, Sr. ('73)
S. Curtis Bonner, Jr. ('69)
Faye M. Bracey ('81)
Edmond L. Bradshaw ('89)
John R. Brantley ('77)
Scott E. Breen ('79)
Stephen A. Bressler ('75)
J. Taylor Brite ('50)
Joseph F. Brophy ('93)
Lloyd A. Broussard ('75)
Stanley E. Burch ('67)
William T. Burke, Jr ('61)
Frank B. Burney ('79)
Laura H. Burney ('84)
Pablo V. Bustamante ('77)
Barbara S. Buxton ('87)
Rosa Maria Cabezas-Gil ('87)
San Juanita R. Campos ('87)
J.A. "Tony" Canales ('69)
Charles E. Cantu ('64)
)ohn M. Caraway ('75)
Joseph Casseb ('77)
Paul E. Casseb ( '41)
R. Michael Casseb ('76)
Martha A. Castrejana ('83)
Steven G. Cennamo ('82)
Martin J. Cirkiel ('92)
Nelson A. Clare ('72)
John W. Coates ('88)
Kay Cohen ('92)
Rebecca F. Cohen ('84)
John A. Convery ('83)
The Hon. Robert E. Corlew ('77)
The Hon. John Cornyn ('77)
John R. Courtney ('67)
Denise Voigt Crawford ('80)
Mary Anne Crosby ('65)
William R. Crow, Jr. ('78)

On the Record / Summer 1994

Rex B. Cruse ('88)
Kenneth M. Culbreth ('87)
Joe G. Cumpian ('56)
Frances R. Cusack ('89)
C. Lee Cusenbary, Jr. ('92)
Edmund K. Cyganiewicz ('80)
Jeffrey J. Czar ('82) .,
Gail Dalrymple ('78)
DouglasS. Daniel ('80)
John A. Daniels ('50)
Robert G. Davis ('61)
Dwain Dent ('76)
Lt. Col. Daniel F.F. Derrick ('49)
Laura Lee Dersh ('92 )
Kenneth M. Deubner ('90)
Victor H. De Yurre ('76)
Charles B. Dickinson, Jr. ('61)
Stephen P. Dietz ('7 5)
W. McGregor Dixon, Jr. ('74)
MonicaL. Donahue ('77)
The Hon. David L. Dowd ('83)
Richard K. Dowd ('83)
The Hon. Robert G. Dowd, Jr. ('77)
William T. Dowd ('89)
David L. Downs ('90)
Dennis K. Drake ('71)
Claude E. Ducloux ('76)
Jennifer Gibbins Durbin ('84)
Joan T. Dusard ('72)
Jerry G. Du Terroil ('72)
Sara E. Dysart ( '81)
Rex L. Easley, Jr. ('80)
Jack A. Efron ('57)
Clea Efthimiadis ('85)
John W. Ellis, Jr ('72)
Barbara L. Evans-Cordts ('80)
Beth Lauren Fagin ('92)
W. Deal Fair(' 74)
Gerald G. Fall, Jr. ('77)
EllenS. Feldman ('91)
Remy J. Ferrario ('71)
David W. Finger ('66)
The Hon. Nolajan Fisher ('77)
Sharon Fisher ('87)
John T. Flood ('90)
Christopher N. Forbis ('88)
Renee A. Forinash ('93)
Bobby L. Freeman ('76)
Ernest J. Freitas, Jr. ('82)
Charles S. Frigerio ( '82)
Curtis L. Frisbie, Jr. ('71)
Carman M. Garufi ('83)
Debra U. Garcia ('78)
The Hon. Sarah E. Garrahan-Moulder
('81)

Ana Lisa Garza ('87)
Jose Garza ('78)
Peter F. Gazda ('85)
The Hon. Shay T. Gebhardt ('84)
Joseph G. Gibart ('78)
Melynda Giesenschlag ('77)
Thomas R. Giltner ('86)
Colleen M. Goff ('84 )
Servando H. Gonzales, Jr. ('70)
The Hon. Charles A. Gonzalez ('73)
Henry B. Gonzalez, Jr. ('67 )
Maria C. Gonzalez ('92)
Newby G. Goodwin ('93)
Peter B. Gostomski ('93)
David M. Green ('81)
Paul W. Green ('77)
Tim T. Griesenbeck, Jr. ('76)
Anne Gritzer ('93)
MichaelS. Gunst ('87)
The Hon. Carol R. Haberman ('56)

32

Chris A. Hale ('78)
Janet RioJa Hale ('78)
William D. Hamker ('84)
Norma Hand ('81)
Britannia Hobbs Hardee ('92)
Thomas W. Hardy ('53)
The Hon. Sid L. Harle ('80)
Daniel J. Harlan ('75)
Charles E. Harrell ('81)
Jody M. Harrington ('79)
John W. Harris, Jr. ('81)
William H. Harris ('88)
George W. Harrison ('69)
Joseph M. Harrison, IV ('84)
Larry W. Harrison ('75)
James W. Hart ('80)
Albert W. Hartman ('73)
Richard E. Haynes ('69)
Andrew C. Heinrichs ('75)
Nina E. Henderson ('89)
Donald F. Hendrie ('67)
Rodolfo 0. Hernandez ('80)
Earl M. Herring ('87)
A. Dale Hicks ('80)
Margaret K. Hoffman ('75)
Norman K. Hogue ('51)
Walter M. Holcombe ('71)
Cynthia C. Hollingsworth ('74)
Susan Horton ('79)
Frank N. Hudson ('74)
Alberto R. Huerta ('71)
R. Kenneth Hurrington ('76)
Richard H. Ihfe ('72)
Kenneth T. Isenberg ('86)
Adolph D. Jacobson ('79)
Danita J. Jarreau ('89)
David G. Jayne ('73)
William P. Jensen ('89)
Karen Ruble Johnson ('70)
Thomas M. Johnson ('89)
Van H. Johnson ('74)
Rhonda Jolley ('82)
Fred R. Jones ('79)
Gregory N. Jones ('77)
Suren Kamath ('90)
Kathryn M. Kase ('90)
William T. Kaufman ('76)
Kevin L. Kelley ('85)
Douglas D. Ketterman ('93)
Thomas G. Keyser ('74)
Suzette S. Kinder ('88)
Royal W. King, Jr. ('59)
Howard Kinnally ('50)
Constance S. Kirk ('84)
Peter M. Koelling ('85)
Patricia J. Kramer ('93)
James P. Kraus ('53)
Edward L. Kurth ('79)
Stephen W. Kuzmich ('82)
Stella 0. Kyle ('87)
Eugene B. Labay ('65)
Mark A. Langan ('80)
Pat Legan ('46)
PaulS. Leslie ('87)
Aloysius A. Leopold ('62)
Stuart F. Lewis ('76)
Lawrence E. Likar ('77)
The Hon. Robert G. Lisotto ('73)
James W. Little ('78)
Susan G. Lozano ('89)
Gregory Luna ('66)
Liska F. Lusk ('85)
Perren A. Lyon ('76)
Karen Macintyre ('75)
Glenn W. MacTaggart ('79)

FRED JONES,

1994-95

PRESIDENT

OF THE lAW ALUMNI ASSOC IATION,
STANDS IN FOR TY GRIESENBECK AT A
FAREWELL LUNCHEON FOR THIRD-YEAR
STUDENTS.

William J. Maiberger, Jr. ('93)
William P. Maines ('84)
DouglasS. Malany ('82)
Ruth G. Malinas ('87)
Cynthia Kent Maragoudakis ('93)
Joe C. Martin ('92)
Thomas A. Martin ('72)
Ramiro B. Martinez ('53)
Stacey A. Martinez ('88)
Thomas F. Mastin ('78)
Ralph M. Mayen, Jr. ('82)
Maury Maverick, Jr. ('49)
Gary W. Mayton ('76)
Beth E. McAllister ('87)
Donald C. McCleary ('74)
Barry A. McClenahan ('84)
The Hon. Archibald C. McColl ('74)
Mary Jo McCurley ('79)
Frederick J. McCutchon ('85)
Michael J. McEntire ('81)
The Hon. Clarence R. McGowan ('63)
Thomas J. Meaney ('92)
Jordan C. Meyer ('93)
Mark H. Miller ('81)
Terry E. Mitchell ('83)
Dawn E. Moffitt ('89)
Michael J. Molloy ('69)
Paul E. Montgomery ('77)
Mark W. Moran ('93)
G. M. Moreno ('81)
Margaret L. Morey ('77)
Thomas B. Moseley ('91)
Richard M. Mosher ('82)
Jude C. Mueller ('93)
Shonna L. Mulkey ('81)
Mark X. Mullin ('86)
Frank J. Muoio ('75)
William B. Nash ('88)
Nick A. Nichols, Jr. ('77)
Lawrence Noll ('72)
Richard Noll ('75)
Alvin Nored ('70)
Thomas M. O'Brien ('73)
Kenneth Oden, Jr. ('77)
Rees R. Oliver ('82)
John M. Oppenheimer ('68)
Richard D. O'Neil ('78)
Robert H. Osburn ('70)
Randolph N. Osherow ('77)
Nancy L. Otto ('78)
Kay C. Overley ('93)
Shelton E. Padgett ('73)
Ricardo D. Palacios ('70)
John P. Palmer ('88)
Thomas N. Panepinto ('75)
Alwin E. Pape, Jr. ('74)
James B. Parks ('78)
Jack Pasqua! ('57)

New Hispanic Law Alumni Association Sponsors
"Henry B. Gonzalez Awards" Dinner
Jaime J. Peiia ('81)
David C. Pennella ('76)
Lionel Perez ('76)
John M. Petruzzi ('80)
James F. Pigg ('76)
Anthony J. Pons ('50)
Douglas W. Poole ('77)
Steven M. Porter ('80)
Christopher K. Price ('83)
Barry K. Radcliffe ('90)
C. Macon Raine ('49)
Wayne D. Ramsay ('73)
Jeffry H. Ray ('82)
Robert N . Ray ('73)
J.C. Reagan ('56)
Kay L. Reamey ('88)
Margaret J. Reaves ('73)
The Hon. Bonnie Reed ('78)
Alan J. Rich ('71)
Lloyd L. Rich ('93)
Cyrus F. Richards ('72)
Rand J. Riklin ('79)
C. Darby Riley ('76)
Major Leonard Rippey ('86)
The Hon. Raul Rivera ('58)
Richard M. Roberson ('78)
Jeffrey A. Rochelle ('90)
Barbara E. Rosenberg ('76)
Jeffrey L. Rosenfield ('87)
Joseph Rubin ('86)
Sherril Kolenda-Rubin ('86)
Karl L. Rubinstein ('68)
Susan P. Russell ('90)
Frank Z. Ruttenberg ('79)
EdwardS. Saconas ('63)
Christina Samaniego ('81)
Rosilyn E. Sampson ('85)
Antonio R. Sanchez, Jr.('69)
Laura C. Santos ('90)
Anthony W. Sauer ('72)
Alex J. Scharff ('91)
John Scarzafava ('75)
Michael G. Schlafy ('86)
H. Pamela Schoch ('77)
Harry J. Schulz, Jr. ('69)
Yava Scott ('80)
Richard V. Secord, Jr. ('83)
Joseph A. Sedlak ('77)
David L. Shapiro ('70)
Wavie C. Sharp ('71)
Edward F. Shaughnessy III ('81)
HenryS. Shaw ('76)
David M. Shearer ('90)
Daniel J. Sheehan, Jr. ('74)
John F. Sheely ('78)
Jeffrey W. Shell ('91)
John H. Shields ('89)
Robert Shivers ('72)
James F. Shrewsbury ('82)
Bernard L. Shub ('88)
The Hon. Michael W. Shuff ('75)
E. Wayne Shuffield ('89)
Darryl J. Silvera ('89)
D. Timothy Simpson ('78)
Thomas E. Sisson ('80)
Allan C. Skinner ('32)
Alan Soefje ('70)
Federico Soforo ('73)
Brian Sokolik ('76)
Constance R. Somers ('80)
Frank R. Southers ('60)
Scott A. Sowell ('77)
Hugh D. Spears ('86)
George H. Spencer, Jr. ('77)
Steve A. Springer ('80)

James D. Stewart ('64)
Mary Brennan Stich ('81)
Charles J. Stockstill ('68)
Catherine M. Stone ('82)
Nina C. Stone ('88)
Pauline B. Stout ('73)
The Hon. Gus J. Strauss ('68)
Leslie J. Strieber ('84)
Richard A. Strieber ('85)
Garvin P. Stryker ('74)
Oliver Sutton ('76)
William E. Tapovatz ('75)
William A. Taylor ('87)
Raymond E. Taylor ('69)
Patrick P. Thomas ('68)
Richard Gary Thomas ('72)
Patricia Thompson ('77)
RobertS. Thompson ('73)
Janice J. Thomson ('82)
Peter Torres, Jr. ('63)
Roe! R. Trevino ('76)
WilliamS. Trivette ('78)
RobertS. Trudeau ('87)
Martha J. Trudo ('70)
Roy C. Turcotte ('75)
Robert J. Uhlenbrock, Jr. ('87)
Keith N. Uhles ('82)
Michael J. Urbis ('89)
Garry W. Vacek ('74)
Barbara A. Vanderbeck ('81)
Gilbert Vara, Jr. ('85)
John M, Vernon ('78)
James Viesca ('72)
Alejandra I. Villarreal ('79)
Charles E. Vogan, Jr. ('73)
PeterS. Vogel ('76)
Harold H. Walker, Jr. ('80)
Christopher B. Wallace ('78)
Louis S. Walton ('74)
Peyton D. Waters, Jr. ('77)
Marcia S. Weiner ('70)
Jeffrey D. Weinkle ('78)
Christopher Brian Weixel ('77)
Thomas D. Wells ('72)
Joseph M. Westheimer ('69)
Cheryl A. Whited ('78)
Patricia Wueste-Whitted ('78)
Bradford G. Wiewel ('78)
Mary Wigodsky ('90)
Leslie H. Williams ('69)
Richard D. Williams ('82)
Walter V. Williams ('88)
David B. Wilkerson (81)
Miguel D. Wise ('84)
Randolph N. Wisener ('87)
The Hon. Don Wittig ('65)
Linda Wong ('79)
Richard D. Woods ('72)
Wanda Mason Wray ('77)
The Hon. Waldo "E. Ximenes ('49)
Steven J. Zauft ('74)

ACADEM IC VICE PRESIDENT CHARLES

l.

COTRELL AND MALDEF PRESIDENT

ANTONIA HERNANDEZ ENJOY THE AWARD CEREMONIES .

The new Hispanic Chapter of the Law Alumni Association of
St. Mary's University sponsored the second annual "Henry B.
Gonzalez Achievement Awards" dinner on February 26, 1994.
The event, which was held to honor three recipients of the
awards, attracted a crowd of more than 200 people. The 1994
recipients were Norma V. Cantu, Assistant Secretary for Civil
Rights, United States Department of Education; Albert H.
Kauffman, Senior Litigation Attorney, Mexican American Legal
Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF), San Antonio office;
and Maury Maverick, Jr. ('49), civil liberties activist, attorney,
politician, and journalist. Antonia Hernandez, President of
MALDEF, was the keynote speaker.
The Henry B. Gonzalez Achievement Award was established last
year by the St. Mary's Hispanic Law Students Association to recognize outstanding contributions to the advancement of the Hispanic community. This year it was sponsored by the newly established Hispanic Law Alumni Association; Vincent A. Lazaro
('89) and Susana Lopez ('94) served as Co-Coordinators of the
event.
According to the Mr. Lazaro, the Hispanic Law Alumni Association was established to support the School of Law in achieving
its educational goals, especially those affecting Hispanic students, and to assist Hispanic students and graduates in job placement. It also will help the Law School in its "vigorous recruitment" of Hispanic students and in its fundraising.
The officers of the Hispanic Law Alumni Association are Vincent A. Lazaro ('89), President; Irene Alarcon ('90), President-Elect; Leo D. Figueroa ('83 ), Vice-President; Alicia D.
Calderon ('87), Secretary; and William V. Rainey ('87), Treasurer. The members of the Board of Directors are Rolando C.
Andrade ('88), Cynthia M. Cano ('94), Eduardo R. Castillo
('90), Leticia Cortez-Ramirez ('87), Victor 0. Enriquez ('82),
Rene Escobedo ('93), Frank G. Garda ('94), William J. Hawbecker ('90), Susana Lopez ('94), Evelyn M. Martinez ('87),
Diana E. Morales ('93), Jaime J. Pefia ('93), Elizabeth
Ramirez ('91), Raul A. Rios ('90), David J. Rodriguez ('90),
and Jesse A. Sepulveda ('88).

33

UMN!E/I

NEWS

Today, the challenges of the legal profession and legal education
are much greater than they were when I began practicing
law ... .It's obvious, too, that lawyers' roles have changed.

R EV . J OH N M ODER, D EAN B ARBARA B ADER A LDAVE, T HE H ONORAB LE JOHN
C ORNYN

(' 77),

AND TI M T . G RIESENBECK, J R.

The Honorable John Cornyn ('77) Honored As
H1994 Distinguished Graduate"
The Honorable John Cornyn, Justice of the Supreme Court of
Texas, was honored by St. Mary's University School of Law
and the Law Alumni Association at a reception in downtown
San Antonio on May 13. The event attracted scores of Law
School graduates, attorneys, and friends of Justice Cornyn. Law
Alumni Association President Tim T. Griesenbeck, Jr., a classmate of Justice Cornyn, presented the Justice with a plaque
which named him the "1994 Distinguished Law Graduate."
A 1977 graduate of St. Mary's University School of Law, Justice Cornyn has served on the Supreme Court of Texas since
1991. He is the Supreme Court's liaison to the Board of Law
Examiners and was the liaison to the Gender Bias Task Force,
which was chaired by Dean Barbara Bader Aldave and which
completed its work in March 1994. Justice Cornyn was the Presiding Judge of the Fourth Administrative Judicial Region from
1989 to 1992, and served as the Judge of the 37th District
Court in Bexar County from 1985 to 1990. Earlier, he was a
partner in the San Antonio firm of Groce, Locke & Hebdon.
Upon accepting the plaque, Justice Cornyn made a few
remarks, which are excerpted below:
It is natural, at times like these, to reflect on the past; and, of
course, a lot has happened since I graduated from the Law School
almost seventeen years ago. Of course, my professional training
began at St. Mary's, and I am grateful for the firm educational
foundation that I have been building on ever since.

Things have also changed quite a bit at St. Mary's since I left:







Two new deans;
the construction of a beautiful new library;
the diversification of the faculty;
an increase in the faculty's contribution to legal scholarship;
an expansion of the curriculum;
and - I can say from the interns and briefing attorneys who
have attended this school- St. Mary's students are much
better prepared now for the vicissitudes of a life in the law
than they were when I graduated.

On the Record / Summer 1994

34

I'm confident that the Law School will keep pace with these
changes in the profession, and I hope that in doing so, it will earn
a well-deserved reputation as a place where all views are solicited,
and where divergent views are tolerated, if not welcomed; and
that, thus, St. Mary 's will contribute to finding solutions to these
new and different demands made on our legal system.
Other recent recipients
of the "Distinguished
Graduate Award"
include Karen Ruble
Johnson ('70), former
Executive Director of
the State Bar ofTexas;
the Honorable Michael
J. McCormick ('70),
Presiding Judge of the
Texas Court of Criminal
Appeals; the Honorable
Blair Reeves ('51),
Chief Justice of the
Texas Court of Appeals
for the Fourth Supreme
Judicial District; and
Margaret Meyer Maisel
('71 ), a partner in
Tinsman & Houser.

"DISTINGUISHED GRADUATE"
NOMINATIONS
If you wish to nominate someone for
the 1995 Distinguished Graduate
Award, please write a letter stating
the name of your nominee and the
reasons why you think he or she merits the award, and send it to: Distinguished Graduate Award Committee,
Law Alumni Association, One Camino
Santa Maria, San Antonio, Texas
78228-8606. In accordance with the
selection guidelines promulgated by
the Board, the Committee will select
a person of "integrity, stature, and
demonstrated ability ... who has distinguished himself/herself in his/her
chosen profession." No candidates
who are running for public office during the nomination period will be
considered.

Law Alumni Association Sponsors
HDay,in,the,Life" Series on Legal Careers
The Student Services Committee of the Law Alumni Association sponsored a "Day-in-the-Life" speaker series for students at
St. Mary's University School of Law. Headed by Rosa M.
Cabezas-Gil ('87), the Committee organized a two-week
lunchtime series of panel discussions in which local attorneys
spoke about their areas of practice.
The first session, devoted to "Law-Firm Life," featured four
speakers who discussed their different perspectives as attorneys
in small, medium, and large firms, and in solo practice. The
two-week series also included speakers who described their
work as mediators, judges, litigators, and lawyers specializing in
environmental, tax, business, criminal, public-interest, government, real estate, family, and corporate law. The sessions,
which included a free pizza-and-salad lunch provided by the
Office of Career Services, were a big hit with the law students:
the room always was packed.

CLASS

N 0 T E S

1932-39
Class Agent:
Joseph T. Kenny ('37)
P.O. Box 13122
San Antonio, Texas 78213
(210) 822-5256

1940-49
Class Agents:
The Honorable Robert Lozano ('40)
County Court at Law No.6
Bexar County Justice Center
300 Dolorosa
San Antonio, Texas 78212
(210) 220-2156
Charles W. Grace ('50)
Law Offices of Charles W. Grace
118 W. Hollywood
San Antonio, Texas 78212
(210) 736-9535
At the twenty-third Annual Awards
Dinner of the Consumer Federation of
America, the Honorable Henry B.
Gonzalez ( '4 3) was presented with the
Philip Hart Public Service Award, in
recognition of his "Consistent and
Courageous Defense of the Public Interest" throughout thirty-two years of public service. During the past year, Representative Gonzalez also was recognized
by the Hispanic Issues Section of the
State Bar ofTexas, which gave him a
Certificate of Appreciation, and by the
Association ofT rial Lawyers of America, which gave him the Amicus Award
for his "steadfast leadership in sounding
the alarm about the looming crisis in the
savings and loan industry." Last year his
alma mater also presented him with an
award, the St. Thomas More Award, "in
recognition of his exceptional contributions in public service." Representative
Gonzalez was the first graduate to be
honored with the St. Mary's Distinguished Law Graduate Award, in 1973.

1955-59
Class Agents:

Class Agents:

John A. Daniels ('50)
Daniels & Daniels
603 Navarro, Suite 1100
San Antonio, Texas 78205-1837
(210) 225-4595; FAX (210) 225-5673

Carl Pfeiffer ('55)
Chair, First American Title Co.
1919 Loop 410 N.W.
San Antonio, Texas 78213
(210) 341-6633; FAX (210) 341-6614

Roy R. Barrera, Sr. ('51)
Nicholas & Barrera, P.C.
424 E. Nueva
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 558-3993; FAX (210) 224-5890

Jack A. Efron ('57)
Jack A. Efron, Inc.
70 N.E. Loop 410, Suite 660
San Antonio, Texas 78216
(210) 366-9676; FAX (210) 366-0412

John A. Daniels ('50) began his legal
career as a prosecutor and judge in the
Municipal Court of the City of San
Antonio. He was a member of the City
Council of San Antonio in the mid1950s, serving as Mayor ProTem during
his last term in office. In 1957, he was
selected San Antonio's "Outstanding
Young Man of the Year." Daniels, a former Chair of the Democratic Party of
Bexar County, has practiced law continuously since graduating from St. Mary's.
He and his son, Timothy J. Daniels
('79), are partners in Daniels & Daniels
in San Antonio. Daniels and his wife,
Eileen, have three other sons-Michael,
Brian, and Tommy-and several grandchildren.
On the occasion of his retirement from
the Bench, the Honorable Blair Reeves
('51), Chief Justice of the Fourth Court
of Appeals, was honored by the San
Antonio Bar Foundation for more than
forty years of service to the community
and the Bar. The Foundation established the Chief Justice Blair Reeves
Scholarship at St. Mary's University
School of Law this year. At another ceremony held in Chief Justice Reeves'
honor, Bishop Earnest Dixon presented
him with the prestigious Martin Luther
King, Jr., Distinguished Achievement
Award for his extraordinary lifelong
commitment to human rights.

35

William H. Robison ('58)
Matthews & Branscomb, P.C.
106 S. St. Mary's Street, Suite 800
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 226-4211; FAX 299-3589
Jack Guenther ('59)
1777 N .E. Loop 410, Suite 1512
San Antonio, Texas 78217
(210) 829-1800; FAX (210) 829-5001
Robert Guy Davis ('59) is litigating in
Dallas in the areas of criminal defense
and personal injury. Married, with four
children and "six and a half' grandchildren, he is an avid tennis player and has
won several speech contests sponsored
by Toastmasters International in Texas
and California.

Class Agents:
Joe Villarreal, Jr. ('62)
Joe Villarreal, Jr., Inc.
58201-10 West
San Antonio, Texas 78201
(210) 736-2888; FAX (210) 736-0437
Damon Ball ('63)
Ball & Weed, P.C.
745 E. Mulberry, Suite 500
San Antonio, Texas 78212
(210) 731-6302; FAX (210) 731-6499

A. J. Cook ('60) is a nationally syndicated columnist, based in Memphis,
Tennessee, who writes about tax law for
Scripps Howard Service.

fessional association of more than 250
attorneys who practice adoption law
and handle adoption cases.

Gene P. Toscano ('62) is proud to
announce that his son Andrew, a recent
Baylor Law School graduate, has joined
him in the practice of general law at
their offices in San Antonio.
Joe Villarreal, Jr., ('62) has been elected Treasurer of the San Antonio Family
Lawyers' Association.

CHARLES

J.

M ULLER

('69)

Class Agents:

Class Agents:
Dan Rutherford ('66)
Rutherford & Associates
825 S. St. Mary's
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 225-4200; FAX (210) 225-4495
John U. Hemmi ('68)
Law Offices of John U. Hemmi
115 E. Travis, Suite 1900
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 225-4321; FAX (210) 225-2019
Richard J. Clarkson ('68) recently
celebrated ten years as Editor-in-Chief
of the Texas Evidence Reporter, and has
completed a second term on the
Administration of the Rules of Evidence Committee of the State Bar of
Texas.
Last October, John W. (Bill) Harris,
Jr. ('68) completed twenty-five years of
service as a prosecutor with the Bexar
County District Attorney's Office-his
first and (so far) only employment since
passing the Bar in 1968.
The Honorable Alma Lopez ('68)
recently was appointed to the Fourth
Court of Appeals in San Antonio.

On the Record/ Summer 1994

Charles J. Muller ('69)
Matthews & Branscomb, P.C.
One Alamo Center
106 S. St. Mary's Street, Suite 800
San Antonio, Texas 78205-3692
(210) 226-4211; FAX: (210) 226-0521

Raymond E. Taylor ('69), of the San
Antonio law firm of Taylor, Holiner &
Spicer, P.C., has become a Diplomate of
the American Board of Professional Liability Attorneys, in recognition of his
contributions to the defense of lawyers
in disciplinary matters. During the
course of the year, only thirteen other
lawyers from across the United States
were similarly honored. He is the author
of Defending Lawyers in Disciplinary Proceedings, published by Bancroft-Whitney, and of an article on the grievance
process, which appeared in the May
1988 issue of the Texas Bar Journal.

Raymond E. Taylor ('69)
Taylor, Holiner & Spicer
4 718 Camino Dorado
San Antonio, Texas 78233
(210) 656-3711; FAX (210) 590-1544
Ronald F. Ederer ('69), former U.S.
Attorney for the Western District of
Texas, has become Of Counsel at the
law firm of Groce, Locke & Hebdon.
Mr. Ederer handles all aspects of state
and federal litigation, including complex civil litigation and white-collar
criminal defense, and legal transactions
with Mexico.
James D. "Bo" Guess ('69), a shareholder of Groce, Locke & Hebdon, P.C.,
was elected President of the Austinbased Texas Association of Defense
Counsel. The Association is a statewide
organization of approximately 2,200 trial
lawyers who represent defendants in
civil lawsuits. Mr. Guess practices in the
areas of products liability, aviation insurance, and general negligence.
Dale R. Johnson ('69) has been
appointed to serve another term on the
Board of Directors of the American
Academy of Adoption Attorneys, a pro-

DENNIS

K.

DRAKE

('71)

Class Agents:
Dennis K. Drake
Law Offices of Dennis K. Drake
Lincoln Center, Suite 235
7800 I-10 West
San Antonio, Texas 78230
(210) 366-9636; FAX: (210) 366-2532
Donato D. Ramos
Person, Whitworth, Ramos, Borchers
& Morales
602 E. Calton Road
P.O. Box 1262
Laredo, Texas 78042-1262
(210) 727-4441; FAX (210) 727-2696
Dennis K. Drake writes: Please tell all of
my former classmates that I am looking

forward with great anticipation to hearing
from them real soon. We all have news to
share . Tell them to send it to me. They can
mail it, phone it, fax it, or hand-deliver it;
but let's hear it .

Class Agent:
Roy L. White
Douglas & Elms, Inc.
Lincoln Center
7800 I-10 West, Suite 600
San Antonio, Texas 78230
(210) 349-8877; FAX (210) 349-4926

David J. LaBree, a partner with Dallasbased Strasburger & Price, L.L.P.,
recently was appointed Chairman of the
Governmental Liability Committee of
the Defense Research Institute. LaBree
previously served as the First Assistant
City Attorney and Chief Trial Attorney
for the City of El Paso.
Jack M. Partain, Jr., a partner in the
San Antonio offices of Fulbright &
Jaworski, received board certifications
in Business Bankruptcy Law from both
the American Bankruptcy Institute and
the Commercial Law League of America. He is a member of the first class of
inductees of each of these organizations.

Marshall Fein's nine-year-old daughter,
Priscilla Condra, was selected to play
the part of Carson Lee Davis on the
CBS television series "Hearts Afire."
Class Agent:
Jerry T. Steed is a founding partner in
the law firm of Baucum & Steed, P.C.,
located in San Antonio.

Garvin P. Stryker
Stryker & Davis
4040 Broadway, Suite 400
San Antonio, Texas 78209
(210) 820-3440; FAX: (210) 820-3485

++wJ
Class Agent:

DAVID J. lABREC ('73)

Allan B. Polunsky
Polunsky & Beitel
8000 I-10 West, Suite 1600
San Antonio, Texas 78230
(210) 340-4488; FAX: (210) 341-0732

Class Agents:
David J. LaBree
Strasburger & Price, L.L.P.
901 Main Street, Suite 4300
Dallas, Texas 75202
(214) 651-4300; FAX (214) 651-4330

IMwi

J.

KEN NUNLEY

('76)

Class Agent:
J. Ken Nunley
Law Offices of J. Ken Nunley
194 S. Main Street, Suite 301
Boerne, Texas 78006
(210) 249-3333; FAX: (210)249-3421
After graduating from St. Mary's, J. Ken
Nunley began practicing law with an
uncle, W. Patrick Dodson, in Uvalde,
Texas. The association evolved into the
firm of Dodson, Nunley & Taylor, P.C.,
which at one time had offices in Uvalde,
Del Rio, Kerrville, Hondo, and Crystal
City. Mr. Nunley left the firm in 1989 to
join Soules & Wallace in San Antonio,
where he practiced for three and a half
years. In June 1992, he opened his own
firm in Boerne, Texas. That firm now is
Nunley, Brant & Davis. Mr. Nunley is
Board-certified in Civil Trial Law and
does nothing but trial work, representing
both sides of the docket. His wife is T eri
Nunley; his third child, Tara Leigh, was
born on September 23, 1993; and his
first grandson, James Cole Simpson, was
born on March 17, 1994. Mr. Nunley
claims that it will be impossible for him
ever to retire, and therefore he agreed to
be a Class Agent. He looks forward to
hearing from everyone.
Claude Ducloux of Austin is the Chairman of the Board of the College of the
State Bar of Texas.

Shelton Padgett
Akin, Gump, Hauer & Feld, L.L.P.
300 Convent, Suite 1500
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 270-0800; FAX: (210) 224-2035

Peter S. Vogel, a partner in the law firm
of Gardere & Wynne, is the President of
the Dallas Bar Association for 1994.
37

radio station three years ago and, as he
puts it, "still dabbles in that."

Class Agent:
Kim Weixel
Law Offices of Christopher Brien
Weixel
105 S. St. Mary's, Suite 700
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 227-6042; FAX: (210) 225-4539
Susan Biggs has been elected Vice President of the San Antonio Chapter of
the Federal Bar Association.
Tom Broussard was a briefing attorney
for Judge Truman E. Roberts of the
Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in
1978-79. He worked in the Office of the
Attorney General in 1979-80. In 1982,
he and Lloyd A. Broussard ('75)
formed Broussard & Broussard, practicing civil litigation in Austin. He now
has a solo practice, and is active in Volunteer Legal Services of Central Texas.
In 1990, the Honorable Robert E. Corlew III, was elected to his present position as Chancellor of the Sixteenth
Judicial District of the State of Tennessee. He previously had served in elective office on the City Council and as
General Sessions Judge. Tennessee is
one of only four states that have a separate equity-court system, and Chancellor
Corlew is one of thirty-one Chancellors
statewide. He married Beverly Krauss in
1985 and has three children-Melissa
(six years), Robby E., IV (four years),
and John (two years) . Chancellor Corlew, a member of the Army Reserves, is
the Commander of a military-law
detachment in Knoxville. He is active in
his community and has served as State
President of the Jaycees, Deputy Governor of the Lions' Club, a member of the
Executive Committee of the Boy Scouts,
Chairman of the Board of the local children's museum, and Director of the
Foundation for a local university, where
he also teaches a class as an adjunct professor. Chancellor Corlew bought a
On the Record / Summer 1994

Jerry Morrell has a solo practice in San
Antonio. He has four children, two girls
and two boys, who are ten, four, two,
and one.
Randy N. Osherow has been certified
as a Business Bankruptcy Specialist by
the Commercial Law League of America (CLLA), Academy of Commercial
and Bankruptcy Law Specialists. He is
one of only forty-five attorneys nationwide to be so certified. Founded in
1895, the CLLA is the nation's oldest
commercial litigation and bankruptcy
organization, with a membership of
5,000 attorneys and other experts in
credit-related fields.

Class Agents:
William "Bill" R. Crow, Jr.
Ball & Weed, P.C.
745 E. Mulberry, Suite 500
San Antonio, Texas 78212
(210) 731-6345; FAX: (210) 731-6499
Tim Tynan
Attorney at Law
8000 I-10 West, Suite 1000
San Antonio, Texas 78230
(210) 341-2020; FAX (210) 344-6460
William R. Crow, Jr., Past-President of
the Law Alumni Association, represented the Association as a member of the
Board ofTrustees of St. Mary's University during the 1993-94 academic year.
Mr. Crow is a partner in the San Antonio firm of Ball & Weed.
Raymond A. Desmone, a sole practitioner in Irving, Texas, has written the
Pacific Northwest Employer's Guide and
the Tennessee Employer's Guide, published by Summers Press, Inc. The
guides are handbooks of state and federal employment laws and regulations,

JANET R IOLA H ALE

('78)

and are written for the lay employer
with citations for lawyers.
Sandra Grisham worked as legal counsel in the Texas Senate after graduation.
Subsequently, she was stationed in
Aberdeen, Scotland, where she dealt
with North Sea oil and gas activities.
Her international oil and gas experiences included training and technology
transfer in China, along with international publications. Listed in Who's
Who in American Law for over ten years,
Ms. Grisham currently has her own law
practice in Dallas, where she focuses on
bankruptcy, family, personal injury, and
workers' compensation law. She's married to Weldon Grisham, an attorney
and CPA. Her son Scott, who started
junior high school this year, was on an
undefeated baseball team last summer.
Janet Riola Hale practices business and
corporate law at Hale & Hale in Austin.
She is married to Chris A. Hale ('78),
and has four sons-Will (twelve years),
Pat (ten years), Mike (eight years), and
Jack (six years). She is an active volunteer in her community.
Shirley Hale Mathis practices law in
the Laredo firm of Mann, Trevino, Hale
& Gallego, which specializes in property
law, oil and gas law, probate, and insurance defense. She also serves as a courtappointed mediator. She is married to
Ronald K. Mathis and has a son Jared
(seven years), and a stepdaughter
Audrey (twelve years). Ms. Mathis has
been a member of Bethany House for
ten years, and is a member of Stop
Child Abuse and Neglect (S.C.A.N.) .

The Honorable Bonnie Reed, Bexar
County Court Judge, was selected by
the U.S. Department of State last year
to participate in a cultural-exchange
program with Israel. She has been
named "Outstanding Young San
Antonian" by the Jaycees, and was
inducted into the San Antonio
Women's Hall of Fame. She serves on
the boards of Planned Parenthood,
Temple Beth-El, the Jewish Federation,
and the San Antonio Area Girl Scouts.
In her spare time, Judge Reed enjoys
performing in community-theater
productions.
Zoleta Courtney Stefanssor practices
law on a part-time basis in Fort Worth,
Texas, where she handles personalinjury and employment cases. She married Karl in 1981, and has two sons, Erik
(five years) andJ.C. (nine years). She is
President of the Board of the Montessori
School, a Cub Scout Den Leader, and
· an active volunteer in her community.
Thomas R. Stevens has formed a partnership in San Antonio under the name
of Stevens & Weiss, P.C. Mr. Stevens is
on the Board of Directors of the San
Antonio Defense Council.
Robert Ulman has been elected a
Director of the San Antonio Family
Lawyers' Association.
Brad Wiewel is in his third or fourth
"career" since law school. He says his
major occupation now is being a husband to his wife Cindy, and a father to
his sons, Sam (three years) and Andy
(seven months). Mr. Wiewel is a solo
practitioner in Austin, where he practices family, consumer, and personalinjury law. He is a certified mediator
and arbitrator, and the Co-Founder of
the Dispute Resolution Center of
Austin. He is active in his church and
the Christian Legal Society.
Susan G. Wright practices oil and gas
law at Holtz & Wright in Houston.

IMMJ
Class Agents:
Debbie (Becker) Ackerman
Associate General Counsel
Southwest Airlines Co.
2702 Love Field Drive
P.O. Box 36611
Dallas, Texas 75235
(214) 904-4665; FAX: (214) 904-4086
Jane E. Bockus
Clemens & Spencer
112 E. Pecan, Suite 1500
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 227-7121; FAX (210) 227-0732

DENISE VOIGT CRAWFORD

('80)

Antonio, Galveston, Boston, and
Chicago. She serves on the Advisory
Council of Executives of the School of
Business and is President of the Forum
on Entrepreneurship.

Frank Burney has been named Chair of
the Board of the Texas Lyceum Association, Inc. Frank's wife Laura ('84) gave
birth to their third child, Charlotte
Marie, on December 28, 1993.
Timothy J. Daniels is a partner with
the law firm of Daniels & Daniels in
San Antonio.
Barbara Evans-Cordts is with the Puget
Sound Legal Assistance Foundation in
Tacoma, Washington.
The Honorable Richard Garda has
been elected President of the San Antonio Family Lawyers' Association.
Brent Alan Helms had an article published in the December issue of the State
Bar Section Report on "Limitation Title
in Texas: An Historical Discussion."
Mr. Helms is a senior attorney with Fina
Oil and Chemical Company in Dallas,
Texas, where he specializes in the practice of oil, gas, and mineral law.
Phyllis B. Siegel was selected to be the
1993-94 Douglass Entrepreneur-InResidence at the St. Mary's University
School of Business. Ms. Siegel is the
Founder and President of the San Antonio-based Biomedical Development
Corporation, which has evolved from a
single-product company into a scientific
"incubator," developing products in San
39

ROBERT

E.

VALDEZ

('80)

Class Agent:
Robert E. Valdez
Robert E. Valdez, P.C.
9901 I-10 West, Suite 665
San Antonio, Texas 78230
(210) 558-3993; FAX (210) 697-9272
The Texas Securities Board named
Denise Voigt Crawford as the State's
first new Securities Commissioner since
1976. Previously, she served as General
Counsel to the Board. She is a member
of the Securities Law Committee of the
State Bar of Texas and chairs the Banks'
Securities Activities Committee of the
North American Securities Administrators' Association.
Jane Deyeso has been elected Vice
President of the San Antonio Family
Lawyers' Association.

The Honorable Sandee Bryan Marion
was elected Judge of Bexar County Probate Court No.2 in November 1993.
Kay K. Daniel Morgan is in Houston
serving Of Counsel to Andrews &
Kurth, and practicing in the field of
commercial litigation.
Robert E. Valdez recently was appointed
to the Texas Board of Law Examiners.

Patrick B. Tobin recently joined the
firm of]ackson & Walker, L.L.P., as the
head of their corporate practice in San
Antonio.
The White House recently announced
the appointment of G. Mario Moreno,
former Regional Counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Washington, D.C. , to
Assistant Secretary for Intergovernmental and Interagency Affairs with the
U.S. Department of Education.

Gloria Scott has been elected Secretary
of the San Antonio Chapter of the Fed. era! Bar Association.

Class Agents:
Leo Figueroa
Campos, Figueroa, Barrera & Harvey
111 Soledad, Suite 1200
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 226-4211; FAX (210) 227-1030
Charles Hardy
Bass, Higdon & Hardy, Inc.
9004 Wurzbach Road
San Antonio, Texas 78240
(210) 614-4444; FAX (210) 614-7737

R UBEN R. P ENA

Drew R. Fuller, formerly with the firm
of Gresham, Davis, Gregory, Worthy &
Moore, has become a member of the law
firm of Cauthorn, Hale & Hornberger,
Inc., in San Antonio.

('81 )

Class Agents:
Larry Kurth
Jones, Kurth & Treat, P.C.
10100 Reunion Place, Suite 600
San Antonio, Texas 78216
(210) 344-3900; FAX (210) 366-4301
Ruben R. Pefia
Martinez, Barrera y Pena, L.L.P.
1213 E. Tyler
Harlingen, Texas 78550
(210) 425 -7328; FAX (210) 425 -5266
Ruben Pefia, a named partner of
Martinez, Barrera y Pena, L.L.P., has
been active in personal-injury and labor
law. He speaks at various CLE seminars
for the State Bar and the University of
Houston. Mr. Pena, who keeps active
with his four children, horses, cows, and
fishing, would like to hear from his
classmates and place information about
them in the next issue of On the Record.
Sara E. Dysart recently formed the San
Antonio firm of Dysart, Malone &
Bennack.
On the Record /Summer 1994

C HARLES

S.

FRIG ERIO

(' 82)

Class Agents:

Charles Hardy has been elected Treasurer of the San Antonio Family
Lawyers' Association.

Charles S. Frigerio
City Attorney's Office
P.O. Box 839966
San Antonio, Texas 78283-3966
(210) 299-8950; FAX (210) 299-8940
Kevin McCalla
TNRCC Legal Division
P.O. Box 13087
Austin, Texas 78711-3087
(512) 239-0658; FAX (512) 475-2266
Charles S. Frigerio writes: Hear ye, hear
ye, Class of 1982, please send all news to :
Charles S. Frigerio, Deputy City Attorney, P.O. Box 839966, San Antonio,
Texas 78283-3966 .
Maria Luisa Holmgreen is the
President-Elect of the San Antonio
Chapter of the Federal Bar Association.
Ed Schweninger was selected as the
Chief of the Civil Section of the Bexar
County District Attorney's Office.
40

C OLLEEN M ULLEN G OFF

(' 84)

Class Agent:
Colleen Mullen Goff
H.B. Zachry Company
310 S. St. Mary's Street, Suite 2600
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 223-4061; FAX: (210) 554-4605

Colleen Mullen Goff writes: Dear Fel-

low Classmates, I've been asked to be
Boswell to every Samuel]ohnson in the
Class of '84, and I'm delighted. I've been
with H.B. Zachry Company since law
school, specializing in construction law,
employment law, and employee benefits.
And, with the opening of the Mexican market, I've been able to merge my prior
degrees in Latin American studies with my
law career-something I never anticipated
and very much enjoy. I'm curious about
what paths you've taken and where they've
led you. Please drop me a note or give me a
call, whatever's convenient, and tell me
what's been happening. I look forward to
hearing from you.
Joanne (Jody) Berscheidt became a
shareholder in Brock & Person, P.C., in
April1993. The firm limits its practice
to insurance defense.
Dawna Carr is Vice-President of the
San Antonio Young Lawyers'
Association.
Yolanda Gonzales, a Social Security
Disability Specialist, has joined the
office of San Antonio attorney Doug
Dilley ('69).
George Joy has been elected a Director
of the San Antonio Chapter of the Federal Bar Association.

THERESE

M.

HUNTZINGER

('85)

Bexar County Criminal District
Attorney's Office
Bexar County Justice Center
300 Dolorosa, Suite 5072
San Antonio, Texas 78205-3030
(210) 978-0456; FAX (210) 978-0469
Therese M. Huntzinger writes: It is with
pleasure that I accept the request to act as
Class Agent for the class of '85. Translation: Can we talk? I'm still employed with
the District Attorney's Office. So, call me,
stop me in the Courthouse, or catch me at
Happy Hour, whichever comes first, but
let's visit nonetheless. I've spoken with
many friends of '85 and we all talk of the
reunion. Let's do it. Please call with
updates about your and your classmates'
lives and practices (professionally speaking,
of course). Then tune in-and, remember,
it's "On the Record"!
Peter F. Gazda has opened his law
offices at the GPM Building in San
Antonio. His practice is devoted to
commercial and bankruptcy-related litigation, as well as mediation and arbitration. He serves as a mediator and arbitrator on state and federal cases.
Laurel Theresa McLeaish is working as
the Executive Director of the Pennsylvania State Democratic Committee.
Bennett L. Stahl was elected a shareholder in the San Antonio firm of
McCamish & Martin. Mr. Stahl has
been with the firm since 1990.

CHRISTOPHER

THOMAS

R.

J.

VOLKMERE

GILTNER

('86)

('86)

Class Agent:
Thomas R. Giltner
Juvenile Division
Bexar County Criminal District
Attorney's Office
300 Dolorosa, Suite 202
San Antonio, Texas 78204
(210) 554-5262 or 554-7000; FAX
(210) 226-8395
Michael J. Daley has joined the law
firm of Paul Lee Wiley & Associates in
Harlingen, Texas.

Christopher J. Volkmer has become a
new shareholder of Munsh Hardt Kopf
Harr & Dinan, P.C., in Dallas. He practices in the Reorganization/Bankruptcy
Section and is experienced in bankruptcy law, reorganization law, and creditors' rights. He has participated in
numerous complex bankruptcy cases
involving bank groups, subordinated
debt, trade creditors, committees, and
trustees.

Class Agent:

Michael L. Dinnin became a partner in
the firm of Bracewell & Patterson,
L.L.P., in January 1994. He is a litigator
who practices in the Dallas office.
Rosalind D. Gagliano has been appointed to the Board of Directors of the Visiting Nurses Association. Rosalind is a
registered nurse and currently practices
hospital and health care law with the
San Antonio firm of Haynes & Boone.
John Kincade and Leslie Jones Kincade
('87) had a son, Sean Christian, on
June 21, 1993.

Therese M. Huntzinger
Chief, Juvenile Section
41

Michael W. Meier has received an
LL.M. degree in taxation from Georgetown University in May 1993, and has
been promoted to Major in the U .S.
Army Judge Advocate General's Corps.
Susan Stone has become associated
with the law firm of Foster, Heller &
Kilgore in San Antonio.
Kyle C. Watson has been elected a
director of the San Antonio law firm of
Goode, Casseb & Jones, P.C. He has
been a shareholder since 1991, when
the firm was established. Mr. Watson
currently serves as Chair of the Board of
Directors of the Texas Young Lawyers'
Association.

ANDY TAYLOR

('87)

Laura D. Heard is pleased to announce
the opening of the Law Office of Laura
D. Heard in San Antonio.
Leslie Jones Kincade and John Kincade ('86) had a son, Sean Christian,
on June 21, 1993.

L ESLI E

J.

A. SACHANOWICZ

('89)

Class Agent:

Andy Taylor is a partner in the Houston office of Liddell, Sapp, Zivley, Hill
& LaBoon, L.L.P.

Leslie J. A. Sachanowicz
District Attorney's Office
Civil Section
300 Dolorosa, Suite 4049
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 220-2139; FAX (210) 220-2151

Jill Torbert has opened her own practice in San Antonio.

David Earl is the Assistant City Attorney,
Real Estate Section, for San Antonio.
Blake Farenthold practices law in Corpus Christi with Kleberg & Head.

181~1:1
Class Agent:
T HE H ONORABLE STELLA ORTIZ KYLE

('87)

Class Agent:
The Honorable Stella Ortiz Kyle
Presiding Judge
City of San Antonio
Municipal Court
401 S. Frio St., Suite 210
San Antonio, Texas 78207-4432
(210) 299-7130; FAX (210) 270-4259
The Honorable Stella Ortiz Kyle
writes: It's incredible that it's been almost
seven years since we graduated. As your
Class Agent, I would love to hear from you
and share your news with fellow graduates.
I'm looking forward to hearing from you .
John R. Harrison, Jr., opened his
offices for the practice of law at the
Petroleum Tower in San Antonio.
On the Record / Summer 1994

Elizabeth Caples-Rogers
Haynes & Boone, L.L.P.
112 E. Pecan, Suite 1600
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 978-7000; FAX (210) 978-7450
Susan Bowen, an attorney in the Bexar
County District Attorney's Office, was
presented with the employee excellence
award, designating her as one of "Bexar
County's Best" employees.
John P. Palmer has been elected to a
three-year term on the council of the
Alternative Dispute Resolution Section
of the State Bar of Texas. Recently, he
was elected Treasurer of the WacoMcLennan County Young Lawyers'
Association.
Kathleen Fink Watel has joined the
civil section of the Bexar County District Attorney's Office.
42

Patricia Flanagan is at USAA in San
Antonio. As a Lieutenant Colonel, she
served abroad in Desert Storm.
Craig Gargotta has been elected a
Director of the San Antonio Chapter of
the Federal Bar Association.
Denise Hays is in Austin, where she
specializes in education law.
William P. Jensen is an associate with the
Houston law firm of Matthews and Associates. He specializes in the law of intellectual propetty and litigates business tort cases.
Susan Lozano has a lovely daughter,
and practices law in San Antonio with
Davis, Adami & Cedillo.
Marianne Walder Malouf lives in Dallas. She and husband Wayne Malouf
('86) now have two daughters, Natalie
and Anastasia.
Trey Martin and Curtis Cukjati have
founded the law firm of Fritsche, Martin
& Cukjati in San Antonio.

Ira Shine Morgan III has opened a new
office in San Antonio.
Mark Notzon, formerly with the Bexar
County District Attorney's Office, has
joined the San Antonio firm of Branton
& Hall.
Robert Rush and Cliff Herberg ('90)
have formed the offices of Rush & Herberg in San Antonio.
Leslie J .A. Sachanowicz, an attorney in
the Bexar County District Attorney's
Office, was presented with the employee
excellence award, designating him as
one of "Bexar County's Best" employees. In addition, he was selected to participate in the 1993-94 Leadership San
Antonio program, which is cosponsored
by the San Antonio Chamber of Commerce and the San Antonio Hispanic
Chamber of Commerce.
Tony Schagger serves on the Board of
Directors of the San Antonio Young
Lawyers' Association.
Donna Smith is now in Raleigh, North
Carolina. She and husband John
Groelke have two daughters.

May, I am especially excited about being
Class Agent for the Class of 1990. What
an incentive for keeping in touch with all of
my classmates, and what an excuse for
large long-distance phone bills ("But,
honey, I needed to make those calls to write
my On The Record report")! Please don't
be reticent about dropping me a line about
your triumphs. And please don't be shy
about coming to visit the next time you're
in the Yankee-land area. Ideally, I'll have a
job by then and can tell you what it's like to
be a "New York lawyer."
RoseL. Bailey practices tax, family,
and elder law in San Antonio.
Allan K. Butcher has been asked to
write a chapter on the impact of environmental law on Texas agricultural
operations for a book to be published
later this year by West Publishing Company in cooperation with the Environmental and Natural Resources Law Section of the State Bar of Texas.
Gloria Christmas is a Law Clerk for the
Honorable Orlando Garda, U.S. District Judge for the Western District of
Texas.
Tamara L. Cochran-May is the First
Assistant District Attorney for the 79th
Judicial District (Brooks & Jim Wells
Counties). She lives in Agua Dulce,
near Alice, Texas.
Virginia A. Coyle has become associated with the law firm of Clemens &
Spencer in San Antonio.

KATHRYN

M.

KASE

('90)

Class Agent:
Kathryn M. Kase
266 Lark Street
Albany, New York 12210
Kathryn M. Kase writes: Because I
moved to Albany, New York, in early

Nancy L. Farrer is a member of the
Board of Editors of San Antonio Lawyer,
a magazine published by the San Antonio Bar Association.
Edward R. Frnka II has guest-lectured
twice in Professor Lytton's class on
Texas Land Titles at St. Mary's. His
topic was "Writing My First Title Opinion." Mr. Frnka was 1993-94 President
of the Order of the Alamo, one of the
sponsoring organizations of Fiesta San
Antonio.
43

Martha V. Hardy is an Assistant County
Attorney in the Office of the Guadalupe
County Attorney in Seguin. She also has
a private practice in real estate law.
Cliff Herberg and Robert Rush ('89)
have formed the firm of Rush & Herberg in San Antonio.
Helen Herrman married Mark Berridge
in March 1993.
Louise M. Joy, an associate in the
Austin office of Fulbright & Jaworski,
L.L.P., has co-authored Texas Medical
Jurisprudence (lOth ed., 1994) with
Terry 0. Tottenham and J. A. "Tony"
Patterson. She practices in administrative and operational health law.
Patricia Macias is living in El Paso.
Robert J. (Bobby) Perez has become
associated with the law offices of Shelton, Lotz & Valadez in San Antonio.
Octavio Salinas II is an Assistant District Attorney in Webb County. He is
assigned to felony cases at the 49th District Court in Laredo, Texas.
Joanie (Harrison) Sullivan is a Law
Clerk for the Honorable Fred Biery,
U.S. District Judge for the Western District ofTexas.
Victoria Valerga and Debra J. Welch
practice law in the same suite of offices
in San Antonio.
Iris Haley Wigodsky (Sibs., 4oz.) was
born to Mary A. (Peerman) Wigodsky
and her husband Dan on August 15, 1993.

'*"''
Class Agent

Suzanne Schorlemer
Probate Court No. 2
Bexar County Courthouse
300 Dolorosa, Suite 4049
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 220-2504

Sylvia H . Imhoff is an associate with
Slack & Davis in Austin. She specializes in products liability (pharmaceuticals and medical devices), negligence,
and wrongful-death cases.

FROM LEFT:

1991

GRADUATES SUZANNE

SCHORLEMER, JENNY SETSER RYMELL, AND
STEPHANIE T IPPEn.

Suzanne Schorlemer writes: To all my
fellow 1991 graduates : I look forward to
hearing your good news!
Fritz Aldrine is an attorney with the
City Attorney's Office in Dallas.

Jennifer and Jonathan Kaplan had a
son, Benjamin, in 1993.
Jeff Laird is a Misdemeanor Chief with
the Harris County District Attorney's
Office.
Bill and Nancy (Raba) Maloy have two
sons- Luke, born in November 1991,
and Trevor, born in March 1993 .

Jill Bindler is working for the Dallas
Federal Public Defender's office.

Dan McCrory is with the Appellate
Section of the Harris County District
Attorney's Office.

Mary and Karl Brock had a son, Zachery Fisher, on September 14, 1992.

Jamie McDonough has opened a law
practice in San Antonio.

Kirsten Anne Carabin has been admitted to practice before the Texas
Supreme Court, the United States District Court for the Western District of
Texas, and the United States District
Court for the Southern District of
Texas. Ms. Carabin and her husband
Dan are attorneys in the San Antonio
law firm of Carabin & Shaw, L.C.

Karen Norris is an associate with Davidson & T roilo, and is Treasurer of the San
Antonio Young Lawyers' Association.

Terry and Kevin Crocker had a son,
Hudson Bishop, on July 4, 1992.
After two years as an associate at
Andrews & Kurth, Ellen S. Feldman
has become the Head of Reference Services for the Washington, D.C., law
firm of Howrey & Simon.
Mike Fields is a Misdemeanor Chief
with the Harris County District Attorney's Office.
Gary Glick has been invited to become
a member of the William Sessions
Chapter of the American Inns of Court.
Sarah Hinojosa is a misdemeanor prosecutor with the Bexar County District
Attorney's Office.

('91)

Margaret Symmonds and Mike Larkin
had a daughter, Katie, last summer.
Stephanie Tippett has opened her own
business called "On Line Designs." She
designs handmade cards and invitations.
Anyone interested may send for a free
brochure: On Line Designs, 947 W.
Oakdale Ave., Suite 1-West, Chicago,
IL 60657.

IMWIJ

Javier Oliva is a professor at the San
Antonio School of Law.
Clipper Peale is working for Senator
Kay Bailey Hutchison in Washington.
Lisa and Eric Ransleban had a daughter, Morgan Lee, on May 8, 1993.
Rosanne Robertson has become associated with Houston attorney Edward Mallett. She concentrates in criminal defense.

MEHRON AzARMEHR

('92)

Ginger and Brett Rowe had a son, B.
Cullen, in 1993.
Jenny Setser Rymel is the District Justice for District IX of Phi Alpha Delta
Law Fraternity International.
Kelly and Alex Scharff had a son,
Brooks Alexander, on May 20, 1993 .
BRITANN IA HOBBS HARDEE

Suzanne Schorlemer was appointed to
the Methodist Hospital Roundtable and
also serves as Secretary of the San
Antonio Young Lawyers' Association.
Susan and Scott Stover had a son, Parker
Christian, in February 1993.

On the Record / Summer 1994

ELLEN S. FELDMAN

44

('92)

Class Agents:
Mehron Azarmehr
Attorney General's Office
Environmental Protection Division
P. 0. Box 12548
Austin, Texas 78711
(512) 475-4025; FAX (512) 320-005 2

Britannia Hobbs Hardee
Law Offices of Soules & Wallace
Frost Bank Tower
100 W . Houston Street, Suite 1500
San Antonio, Texas 78205-1457
(210) 224-9144; FAX (210) 224-7073
Britannia Hobbs Hardee writes: As a
member of the information generation, I
want to hear it all! Please let me know
what you are doing. I think we are on the
brink of some big success stories for our
class, and I want to be a part of them.
Mehron Azarmehr is practicing environmental law in the Environmental Protection Division of the Office of the Attorney General ofTexas. He currently serves
as an Associate Editor for the State Bar of
Texas' Environmental Law Journal. His
most recent article, "Status of] oint and
Several Liability under CERCLA after
Bell Petroleum," was published in the
May issue of the Environmental Law
Reporter (Washington, D.C.).

Georgia Meaney is an Assistant Attorney General in the Law Enforcement
Defense Division in Austin.

John Dulske and his wife Susan had a
son, John Thomas, on January 30, 1994.

Tom Meaney is an Assistant Attorney
General in the Tax Division in Austin.

Elizabeth Friday, formerly a briefing
attorney for Judge David Peeples of the
Fourth Court of Appeals in San Antonio, now is a briefing attorney for the
Fort Worth Court of Appeals.

Lisa R. Miller has joined Groce, Locke
& Hebdon in San Antonio. She formerly was a briefing attorney for Justice Jack
Hightower of the Texas Supreme Court.

Steven Jeffrey Gately and his wife
Kathleen had a son, Jeffrey Braxton, on
July 22, 1993.
After serving as a judicial law clerk for
United States District Judge Ewing
Werlein, Jr., of Houston, Richard Gonzales now is a briefing attorney for Justice Thomas E. Rickoff of the Fourth
Court of Appeals in San Antonio.

James "Jamie" Bagnall, currently an
Assistant Criminal District Attorney in
Navarro County recently ran for Navarro County Judge on the Democratic
ticket.

Kevin P. Hanna now is associated with
Jack P. Kelso ('59) in the practice of
law in Corpus Christi.

Len Briley, formerly a briefing attorney
for Judge Thomas E. Rickhoff, now is an
associate with Kaufman, Becker &
Reibach, Inc.

Guy E. Henry is a staff attorney in the
General Counsel's Office at the Texas
Natural Resource Conservation
Commission.

R. Scott Carlyon has become associated with the San Antonio law firm of
Baucum & Steed, P.C.

Jon Mark Hogg and wife Claire live in
San Angelo, and are the proud parents
of a beautiful baby daughter.

Catherine (Cate) Carter has just finished
her first year as an associate with Ray &
McChristian in El Paso. She passed the
New Mexico Bar Examination.

Deborah Lane now is working as an
Assistant District Attorney for the El
Paso District Attorney's Office, where she
screens misdemeanor and felony cases
and presents indictments to grand juries.
"My criminal law background is definitely
being tested and expanded," she says.

Martin J. Cirkiel is General Counsel
for Charter Medical Corporation.

& Brown, Inc., as an associate.

"The Tort of Bad Faith: Leaving Insurers Defenseless" appeared in South Texas
Law Review and made the National Law
Journal's "Worth Reading" list. He currently is a law clerk for U.S. Magistrate
David G. Lowe, and plans to join the
firm of Harman, Claytor, Corrigan &
Well man in August.

Donald Crook and wife Dee Lancaster
had a baby daughter, Jessica Reid, on
March 18, 1994.

Keith Lauerman opened his own law
office in Austin.

C. Lee Cusenbary, Jr., is living in
Richmond, Virginia. His article entitled

Roche! Lemler recently moved from
Dallas to San Antonio, and joined
Thornton, Summers, Biechlin, Dunham
45

Lanette Lutich is working as a felony
prosecutor with the El Paso District
Attorney's Office.

Laura Gayle Nelson has joined the law
firm of Porter, Rogers, Dahlman, Gordon
& Lee in Corpus Christi. She formerly
was a briefing attorney for Justice Bob
Gammage of the Texas Supreme Court.
Jennifer Nisbet served for a time as inhouse counsel for the San Antonio
Housing Authority, and now has her
own law practice in San Antonio.
Charles M. Philips works for Burnett
and Burnett, Inc., in Odessa, Texas. He
married Dina Moore in May 1992.
Stephen R. Pilcher and his wife Kelly
had their second son, Chad Alan, on
June 19, 1993.
Margaret M. Priesmeyer, formerly of
Rigely and Associates, has joined the
firm of Johnson, Curney & Fields in San
Antonio.
Sh~lly A. Sanford joined the Austin
branch of Bernsen, Jamail & Goodson,
L.L.P., in May 1992. She's practicing
environmental law, general litigation, and
sports and entertainment law. Ms. Sanford encourages all St. Mary's law graduates in the Austin area to meet for breakfast on the first Friday of each month, at
8 a.m., at the Dog & Duck Pub.

Jennifer Hernden Sparr had a son,
Richard Arthur Sparr Ill, on October
29, 1992.

Clay Steadman is a litigation attorney
with the Law Offices of Patricia Bath in
San Antonio.
William Swaim and Missy Hellendale
were married October 9, 1993, in
Austin. Mr. Swaim is an Assistant
County Attorney with the Travis
County Attorney's Office, and recently
passed the U.S. Patent Bar.

Pat Brown Klenk
3323 Perry Lane
Austin, Texas 78731
(512) 452-4573
Patricia Kramer
Attorney & Counselor at Law
222 So. 2nd Street
P.O. Box 3370
Montrose, Colorado 81402-3370
(303) 240-8114

1+&1

MARY A. BELAN

Leah Bumpus Kauffman
Staff Attorney's Office
5th Circuit Court of Appeals
600 Camp Street
New Orleans, Louisiana 70130
(501) 288-9338

Mark Moran
U.S. Court of Appeals
Judge Reynaldo Garza's Office
P.O. Box 1129
Brownsville, Texas 78522-1129
(210) 548-2592

('93)

Mary Ann Bashour Randolph
Johnson, Curney & Fields, P.C.
Attorneys and Counselors at Law
800 Spectrum Building
613 N. W. Loop 410 at San Pedro
San Antonio, Texas 78216-5509
(210) 377-1990; FAX (210) 377-1065
MARK MORAN

Fred Wilson
Harris County
District Attorney's Office
201 Fannin
Houston, Texas 77002
(713) 755-5865; FAX (713) 755-7362

('93)

MARY ANN B ASHOUR RANDOLPH

('93)

Class Agents:
Mary A. Belan
Heard, Goggan, Blair & Williams
Tower Life Building, Ninth Floor
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 225-6763; FAX (210) 225-6410
On the Record/ Summer 1994

Mary A. Belan writes: Hello, fellow
alums! Although I just graduated last year,
I'm so caught up in my work that I've
already lost touch with many of my friends
and classmates. I look forward to hearing
from everyone! Please drop me a note or
call me if you have news or would just like
to stay in touch . I would especially like to
hear from anyone who ventured beyond the
borders of the River City!
Leah Bumpus Kauffman writes: I am
excited about serving as Class Agent

because it is nice to hear news about what
my classmates are doing and what has happened in everyone's life since graduation.
Please keep it touch and let us hear from
you!
Patricia Kramer writes: Dear Class of
'9 3, It's hard for me to believe that it has

been a year since we graduated. Many
things have happened in my life since then,
as I am certain is the case in each of your
lives. Because I had so much fun as SBA
President, I agreed to act as a Class· Agent
and continue to hear about what's gain'
on! I have opened my own office in Montrose, Colorado. It's a little town and the
only way to get here is by crossing a BIG
mountain pass (or two) . Of course, you
get your choice of three or four different
ones! My guest room is always ready if you
need some small-town soothing. I can't
wait to hear what's new with you.
Mark Moran writes: Hello, I'm writing

you from down in Brownsville, where I am
clerking for Judge Reynaldo Garza of the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. St. Mary's is well represented here in
the courthouse. If any of you ever are in
the Valley, or are looking for some networking contacts in these-here parts, do not
hesitate to call me.
Mary Ann Bashour Randolph writes: I
am very excited to serve as your Class
Agent and look forward to hearing from
any of you who would like to fill me in on
what's going on in your life and in your
neck of the woods. If you left San Antonio
for another part of the state or country, I
encourage you to keep us informed of
where you are and what you are doing. If
you still are in San Antonio, please call to
update me on your careers. Hope to hear
from you soon .
Kim Jones Baker is married and living
in Austin, where she works for West
Legal Services.

Joseph F. Brophy has become an associate in the civil litigation and products
liability section of the San Antonio law
firm of Ball & Weed.

IN

MEMORIAM

Robert F. Jennings, Jr. ('48)

Wayne L. Burges has joined the San
Antonio firm of Cauthorn, Hale &
Hornberger, Inc., as an associate.

Fred R. Granberry ('49)
Mary Louise Murray ('52)

Irene G. Cejas has become an associate
with the San Antonio law firm of Ball
& Weed, where she practices in civil
litigation and products liability.

Fred M. Boykin ('56)

Karen Cusenbary recently passed the
Pennsylvania Bar Examination and has
opened her own law office in Washington, D.C.

Joseph A. Rose, Jr. ('59)

George C. Reed ('58)

John M. O'Connell ('60)

Elizabeth L. Higginbotham, formerly
with Wright & Greenhill, P.C., has
joined the offices of Liddell, Sapp, Zivley, Hill & LaBoon, L.L.P., as an associate. She practices as a litigator in the
areas of personal injury and health law.
She is a member of the American
Nurse's Association, the Texas Nurse's
Association, the American Association
of Nurse Attorneys, the Texas Bar
Association, and the Travis County Bar
Association.

Col. Vernon D. Flournoy ('66)
T. J. O'Conner ('71)
Thomas J. Jordan ('73)
Joseph E. Brodigan ('74)
Laurence A. Potter ('78)
Beverly J. Clay ('79)

Kelly McClennahan is an associate
with McCamish & Martin.

Bobby Spence ('80)

Eric Reed is working alongside Carey
Tolin ('92) for U.S. District Judge
Filemon Vela.

James E. Shugart ('80)

Steve Tyler is a law clerk for U.S.
Magistrate John Black in Brownsville,
Texas.

Scott R. Worthen ('82)

Bernice Y. Shapiro ('82)

Lynn L. Dunham ('90)

Jared R. Woodfill has become an associate with the Houston firm of Beirne,
Maynard & Parsons.

47

Clay Steadman is a litigation attorney
with the Law Offices of Patricia Bath in
San Antonio.
William Swaim and Missy Hellendale
were married October 9, 1993, in
Austin. Mr. Swaim is an Assistant
County Attorney with the Travis
County Attorney's Office, and recently
passed the U.S. Patent Bar.

Leah Bumpus Kauffman
Staff Attorney's Office
5th Circuit Court of Appeals
600 Camp Street
New Orleans, Louisiana 70130
(501) 288-9338
Pat Brown Klenk
3323 Perry Lane
Austin, Texas 78731
(512) 452-4573
Patricia Kramer
Attorney & Counselor at Law
222 So. 2nd Street
P.O. Box 33 70
Montrose, Colorado 81402-3370
(303) 240-8114

MARY A . BELAN

Mark Moran
U.S. Court of Appeals
Judge Reynaldo Garza's Office
P.O. Box 1129
Brownsville, Texas 78522-1129
(210) 548-2592

('93)

Mary Ann Bashour Randolph
Johnson, Curney & Fields, P.C.
Attorneys and Counselors at Law
800 Spectrum Building
613 N. W. Loop 410 at San Pedro
San Antonio, Texas 78216-5509
(210) 377-1990; FAX (210) 377-1065
MARK MORAN

Fred Wilson
Harris County
District Attorney's Office
201 Fannin
Houston, Texas 77002
(713) 755-5865; FAX (713) 755-7362

('93)

MARY ANN BASHOUR RANDOLPH

('93)

Class Agents:
Mary A. Belan
Heard, Goggan, Blair & Williams
Tower Life Building, Ninth Floor
San Antonio, Texas 78205
(210) 225-6763; FAX (210) 225-6410
On the Record / Summer 1994

Mary A. Belan writes: Hello, fellow
alums! Although I just graduated last year,
I'm so caught up in my work that I've
already lost touch with many of my friends
and classmates. I look forward to hearing
from everyone! Please drop me a note or
call me if you have news or would just like
to stay in touch. I would especially like to
hear from anyone who ventured beyond the
borders of the River City!
Leah Bumpus Kauffman writes: I am
excited about serving as Class Agent

because it is nice to hear news about what
my classmates are doing and what has happened in everyone's life since graduation .
Please keep it touch and let us hear from
you!
Patricia Kramer writes: Dear Class of
'93, It's hard for me to believe that it has

been a year since we graduated. Many
things have happened in my life since then,
as I am certain is the case in each of your
lives. Because I had so much fun as SEA
President, I agreed to act as a Class· Agent
and continue to hear about what's gain'
on! I have opened my own office in Montrose, Colorado. It's a little town and the
only way to get here is by crossing a BIG
mountain pass (or two) . Of course, you
get your choice of three or four different
ones! My guest room is always ready if you
need some small-town soothing. I can't
wait to hear what's new with you.
Mark Moran writes: Hello, I'm writing

you from down in Brownsville, where I am
clerking for Judge Reynaldo Garza of the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. St. Mary's is well represented here in
the courthouse. If any of you ever are in
the Valley, or are looking for some networking contacts in these-here parts, do not
hesitate to call me.
Mary Ann Bashour Randolph writes: I
am very excited to serve as your Class
Agent and look forward to hearing from
any of you who would like to fill me in on
what's going on in your life and in your
neck of the woods. If you left San Antonio
for another part of the state or country, I
encourage you to keep us informed of
where you are and what you are doing. If
you still are in San Antonio, please call to
update me on your careers. Hope to hear
from you soon.
Kim Jones Baker is married and living
in Austin, where she works for West
Legal Services.

Joseph F. Brophy has become an associate in the civil litigation and products
liability section of the San Antonio law
firm of Ball & Weed.

IN

MEMORIAM

Robert F. Jennings, Jr. ('48)

Wayne L. Burges has joined the San
Antonio firm of Cauthorn, Hale &
Hornberger, Inc., as an associate.

Fred R. Granberry ('49)
Mary Louise Murray ('52)

Irene G. Cejas has become an associate
with the San Antonio law firm of Ball
& Weed, where she practices in civil
litigation and products liability.

Fred M. Boykin ('56)

Karen Cusenbary recently passed the
Pennsylvania Bar Examination and has
opened her own law office in Washington, D.C.

Joseph A . Rose, Jr. ('59)

George C. Reed ('58)

John M. O'Connell ('60)

Elizabeth L. Higginbotham, formerly
with Wright & Greenhill, P.C., has
joined the offices of Liddell, Sapp, Zivley, Hill & LaBoon, L.L.P., as an associate. She practices as a litigator in the
areas of personal injury and health law.
She is a member of the American
Nurse's Association, the Texas Nurse's
Association, the American Association
of Nurse Attorneys, the Texas Bar
Association, and the Travis County Bar
Association.

Col. Vernon D. Flournoy ('66)
T. J. O'Conner ('71)
Thomas J. Jordan ('73)
Joseph E. Brodigan ('74)
Laurence A. Potter ('78)
Beverly J. Clay ('79)

Kelly McClennahan is an associate
with McCamish & Martin.

Bobby Spence ('80)

Eric Reed is working alongside Carey
Tolin ('92) for U.S. District Judge
Filemon Vela.

James E. Shugart ('80)

Steve Tyler is a law clerk for U.S.
Magistrate John Black in Brownsville,
Texas.

Scott R. Worthen ('82)

Bernice Y. Shapiro ( '82)

Lynn L. Dunham ('90)

Jared R. Woodfill has become an associate with the Houston firm of Beirne,
Maynard & Parsons.

47

A Thrice-Told Tale,

or Felix

the Cat

continued from page 13

watched mobs in Little Rock, Arkansas, react violently to court-ordered desegregation
of Central High. The crisis Professor Cahn believed the Court had spared the nation
had arrived.

In voting to hold
"separate but equal"
public education unconstitutional in Brown,
Justice Frankfurter
properly performed his
role as priest in the temple;
in revising the history of
the crisis of 19 3 7, Justice
Frankfurter properly
performed his longerrunning role as guardian
of the Court's virtue.

Writing to a colleague about the continuing crisis in Little Rock, Arkansas, Frankfurter commented that obedience to Brown would be based on "the transcending issue
of the Supreme Court as the authoritative organ of what the Constitution requires ."
When southern segregationists used the discredited doctrines of interposition and
states' rights to make legalistic challenges to Brown, they won the popular battle (for a
while), but they were bound to lose the legal war. The crisis in Little Rock provides
evidence of this. Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus's decision to forbid Negro students
from entering Little Rock Central High in 1957 made him a popular governor, but
also led President Eisenhower to send the 101st Airborne Division to Little Rock to
protect the students. Eisenhower explained on national television that "[m]ob rule
cannot be allowed to override the decisions of our courts" and that "the foundation of
the American way of life is our national respect for law." Frankfurter ingeniously perceived that this struggle was really about the faith of Americans in the authority of the
Supreme Court. The authority was more firmly grounded after the "true" explanation
of Roberts's actions was published.
By the time Professor Herbert Wechsler attacked as unprincipled the Court's reasoning in Brown in his 1959 Holmes lecture, the revisionist history of the constitutional
crisis of 1937 was already in place. The new story of Roberts's actions gave legal scholars another reason to trust the Court with the power of judicial review. Entrusting the
Court with the judicial veto, as Frankfurter well knew, would tr~nscend the Court's
opinion in Brown , despite Wechsler's criticisms. It was enough to "persuade the persuadable" of the Court's integrity and virtue, and enough to prevent critics in the
1950s from using the constitutional crisis of 1937 as precedent.
For those looking to eliminate the Court's role as the "authoritative organ of what the
Constitution requires," Justice Frankfurter's revision of Justice Roberts's shift from
"political" to "principled" left few avenues down which opponents of the Court could
travel to attack the Court's authority. As Frankfurter suggested, obedience to the dictates of Brown would result from acceptance of the Court's authority to interpret the
Constitution, not from a particularized assessment of the correctness of Brown. In voting to hold "separate but equal" public education unconstitutional in Brown, Justice
Frankfurter properly performed his role as priest in the temple; in revising the history
of the crisis of 1937, Justice Frankfurter properly performed his longer-running role as
guardian of the Court's virtue.

FRANKFURTER'S T RIBUTE PROVIDES "TRUER l NSIGI-IT
INTO THE SPEAKER"
Justice Frankfurter began his tribute to Justice Roberts with this statement: "The dictum that history cannot be written without documents is less than a half-truth if it
implies that it can be written from them." Justice Frankfurter's wise advice is a caution
to anyone trying to write about "what really happened," or anyone trying to write
about what someone else claims really happened. But Justice Frankfurter failed to heed
his own advice; relying heavily on a "document" to explain Justice Roberts's "switch"
cannot rewrite the history of the crisis of 193 7.
Commenting on Judge Learned Hand's memorial tribute to Chief Justice Harlan Fiske
Stone, Paul Freund wrote, "Memorial Addresses often provide an even truer insight
into the speaker than into the subject .... " Never was this more true than when Justice
Frankfurter gave tribute to Justice Roberts.
On the Record/ Summer 1994

WE ' RE
A NEW

TURNING
LEAF

'



Thanks to the support of hundreds of
graduates, St. Mary's University School of Law
is moving out of the "basement" position
among U.S. law schools in alumnae/i giving.
Until this past academic year, only 3.5
percent of our graduates made annual
gifts to the School of Law. In 1993,94,
more than 10 percent made volun,
tary contributions-a threefold
increase!
Please help us to continue turning a
new leaf. The reputation of St. Mary's
University School of Law and the
value of your degree will be
enhanced if you lend it your support.
Remember, it doesn't take a huge
contribution: A little seed money
goes a long way. Please consider
making a tax,deductible donation to
your alma mater today. Thank you!
Please make your check payable to St. Mary's University School of Law and send it
to: Law Development, St. Mary's University School of Law, One Camino Santa
Maria, San Antonio, Texas 78228-8602.
You may earmark your gift as a contribution to the General Scholarship Fund (or
any of our named scholarship funds), the Clinical Education Program, or
the Law Library (or any of our special collections,

-~~-a;E~~~~~~~~~~E~~~~~~~~~~
--====:

such as those in environmental law,Alternative--tionallaw, or women and the law) . interna- ~ ly, you may wish to let the Dean use your con-~
~- tribution wherever the need is greatest. In that
- ~ - case, please indicate that you want your gift to go to the
Dean's Discretionary Fund.
-

ST. MARY'SUNIVERSITY



Graduation
Class of 1994
St. Mary's University School of Law

St. Mary's University
School of Law
One Camino Santa Maria
San Antonio, Texas 78228~8606

Non-Profit
U.S. Postage
PAID
San Anton io, Texas
Permit No. 787

Address Correction Requested

Files

Citation

St. Mary's University School of Law, “On the Record Summer 1994: A Magazine for Graduates: St. Mary's University School of Law,” St. Mary's Law Digital Repository, accessed February 22, 2017, http://lawspace.stmarytx.edu/item/STMULaw_OnTheRecord1994Summer.

Document Viewer